Granville Community Calendar

Council Minutes June 1, 1983

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REGULARLY SCHEDULED COUNCIL MEETING
VILLAGE OF GRANVILLE
JUNE 1, 1983
CALL TO ORDER
Mayor Gallant called the meeting to order at 7: 30 p.m..
ROLL CALL
Responding to roll call were:
Councilmember Bartlett
Councilmember Miller
Councilmember Avery
Councilmember Schnaidt
Vice Mayor -
Mayor
Manager -
Davison
Gallant
Plunkett
Councilmember Miller moved to excuse absentee member Harriott and Law Director
Drake. Motion seconded by Councilmember Avery. Motion carried.
MINUTES
MAY 18, 1983 -REGULAR COUNCIL MEETING -A motion to approve the minutes corrected as was made by Councilmember Avery and seconded by Councilmember Miller. Motion carried.
CITIZENS' COMMENTS
Those who signed the register were:
Please see attached attendance sheet marked exhibit "A".
Mrs. Patricia Thomas, 746 Newark-Granville Road, and co-chairperson of the
DenisonG/ ranville Peace Fellowship, was first to speak. She asked what kind of diologue was needed from Citizensin attendance to convince Council of the
appropriativeness of the legislative body passing the proposed Resolution No. 83-22, which endorses the "Call To Halt The Arms Race"?
She referred to the information packet distributed by her to members of Council earlier for their review, and said she would like to hear from individ- ual members on their concerns in endorsing such an important issue. (A copy of the information packet is hereby attached and marked exhibit "B").
Councilmember Bartlett commented that the matter was brought to her attention two weeks ago, and while she has not been involved with this particular piece of legislation, she felt it was her duty as a member of Council to provide a vehicle for peoples expressed wishes. Since introducing Resolution No. 83-22 at the May 18th meeting, Ms. Bartlett had two questions to ask:1) How does this particular resolution directly affect the citizens of Granville?and; 2) oDof Gtheranpveiollpele who are supporting this effort truly r-ep)e<sent -the people or a minority of citizens?
Mr. Fred Knapp, 129 North Pearl Street, spoke on the issue and stated that he felt it was appropriate for Council to take a stand on the nuclear freeze
issue because they represent the community as a whole. Secondly, Granville is already involved through the Crisis Relocation Plan for Licking County, which was drawn up by State officials, in the event of a nuclear attack. Copies of
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Council Meeting Minutes
Village of Granville
June 1, 1983
Page 2 of 4
the Plan for Licking County were distributed to members for their review. (A
copy of the Crisis Plan is hereby attached as part of these minutes and marked
exhibit "C").
Continuing, Mr. Knapp stated that the pols support the nuclear freeze, and over 500 residents have signed the petition calling an immediate halt to the
nuclear arms race. Finally, Mr. Knapp said that it is both appropriate and
desirable for Council to take a stand on this issue.
Mr. Dave Gibbons, 87 Miller Avenue, commented that Council has taken a stand
on larger issues, he felt the nuclear freeze issue was of the utmost importance.
Mr. Bill Nichols, 17 Samson Place, commented that it has become increasingly
clear the last few months that if the United States spends more and more on the
nuclear arms race, we will have a doomsday effect even if they are not used. He said the economic effect is quite destructable. He felt this was an issue
Council should address.
Mr. John Crecca, Jr.,1550 Welsh Hills Road, commented, that a nuclear war will
affect everyone, and he did not question to make more weapons is worse, however, he felt that the President' s efforts for reduction of nuclear arms should be supported rather than an all out freeze.
Others spoke to the issue, many agreed to the reduction but questioned how gets to that point, most felt the nuclear one reduction. freeze was the only way to begin for
Edward Burdick, 128 South Main Street, questioned whether Council had read the entire document that calls for the halt to the nuclear arms race? None of the
members present had seen the whole document. A copy was given to the clerk for duplicating for members. (a copy of the document is hereby attached to these minutes and marked exhibit "D".
Stephen Tischendorf, 123 South Pearl Street, asked members if they would be voting on the whole document? He said he wholely supported the document and the issue, but thought that Council should study the issue well, he said some of the debate is painful, but Council should not be stampeded into making a decision before studying the matter completely.
A straw vote was taken by Dave Woodyard on how many citizens present would like to see the "Call To Halt The Arms Race" Resolution passed by Council. Out of n36ucpleeaorple present at that moment, 35 people raised their hands in support of the arms freeze. One commented that he was not in favor as it was written.
Mr. Robert Tood, 331 N. Pearl Street, arrived at the meeting after the straw count was taken. He felt that the nuclear arms freeze was not an issue Council
should act on, and if the issue is that important to the citizens then the matter should be done by referendum vote.
Councilmember Avery commented that all of Council is deeply concerned with the nuclear arms race, but did not feel that this was a proper forum for this issue. He said he too would like to see a referendum vote.
Councilmember Schnaidt commented that we as Councilmembers were elected to vote donidVnilolat gfeeeml atters, and we have voted on people to represent us. He said he qualified to vote on this issue for everyone.
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Council Meeting Minutes
Village of Granville
June 1, 1983
Page 3 of 4
With no new comments or statements made from citizens in attendance, Council
continued with the next item on the agenda.
COMMITTEE REPORTS
Streets &Sidewalks Committee -Mayor Gallant stated that this item will be
deferred until the conclusion of meeting -Re: Beechwood/ Thornewood Improve- ment.
Utilities Committee -Manager Plunkett commented that representatives from L. H.
Poggemeyer, P.E.,Inc.,will attend the next meeting of Council to give report. Mr. Plunkett said he had a progress pictures of different types of building finishes if members would like to see them in his office.
Development Commission -Councilmember Avery reported on the Development Commission
Meeting held held Thursday, May 26th. At that meeting one application
was reviewed and approval given for a fence.
Members of the Development Commission also met with Ann Munro regarding possible changes in the Zoning Ordinance. He said the Commission had a question
and answer session, copies of items suggested for change will be forwarded to members of Council, written in ordinance form. He said the largest area is basic- ally Village permitted uses and other uses which in the judgement of the Develop- ment Commission are within the intent of this section and are of a class similar
to a use previously listed. He stated that these two items give Development Commission too much latitude.
OLD BUSINESS
Resolution No. 83-22, A" Resolution To Direct The Clerk of Council To Submit A Letter To The President Of The United States Et Al.,Endorsing The "Call To Halt The Arms Race".
Council continued their discussion on the appropriativeness of taking a stand on the above issue.
Vice Mayor Davison commented that he had no problem with Section I of Resolution dNeo.cis8io3n-22. He did however want to examine the whole document before making a on the matter.
Councilmember Bartlett stated that she felt the input shown this .evening and the information presented, shows that this issue would be appropriate for Council to take a stand on, but suggested that she and her colleagues study the whole document before making a decision on the Resolution. Councilmember Bartlett asked those still present if Council would need more input, would people be willing to volunteer that. Those present said yes.
Mayor Gallant commented that he still was not persuaded that this was a proper forum for this issue. He said personally, he has signed the petition, but feels this particular item is not his direct responsibility. He said it was too far from the duties and powers outlined in the Charter.
Councilmember Schnaidt was willing to vote on the Resolution this evening.
Councilmember Miller said that Council can not afford to ignor the issue. Other communities wanted to be heard, so does Granville.
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Council Meeting Minutes
Village of Granville
June 1, 1983
Page 4 of 4
At this time, Vice Mayor Davison moved to table Resolution No. 83-22 until the
Regular Meeting of June 15, 1983.
Voice vote: Five ayes and one nay.
NEW BUSINESS
Motion seconded by Councilmember Miller.
Resolution tabled until June 15, 1983.
Ordinance No. 17-83, "An Ordinance To Amend Certain Sections In The Traffic
Code To Comply With Current State Law And Declaring An Emergency"w,as introduced
and title read in its entirety by Councilmember Schnaidt.
Councilmember Schnaidt moved for passage of the Emergency Section 3, and
read this section in its entirety. Motion seconded by Councilmember Miller.
Roll call vote on the passage of the Emergency Section 3: Schnaidt-yes,
Miller-yes, Avery- yes, Bartlett-yes, Davison-yes, Gallant-yes, Harriott-absent.
Six yes votes one absent.Emergency Section 3, duly passed.
Councilmember Schnaidt moved for the adoption of Ordinance No. 17-83. Motion
seconded by Councilmember Miller. Roll call vote: Schnaidt- yes, Miller-yes,
Bartletty-es, Averyy-es, Davisony-es, Gallanty-es, Harriott-absent. Six yes votes and one absent. Ordinance No. 17-83 duly adopted.
Resolution No. 83-23, "To Authorize The Village Manager To Enter Into An Agreement
With The Muskingum County Board Of Commissioners To Provide Facilities To
House Prisoners"w,as introduced and read in its entirety by Councilmember Miller.
Motion for passage of Resolution No. 83-23 was made by Councilmember Miller
and seconded by Councilmember Bartlett. Motion carried. (The new agreement excludes facilities for housing female prisoners).
MEETING ANNOUNCEMENTS
Opera House Park Improvement Committee -Monday, June 6, 1983, at 7: 30 P.M..
Mayor Gallant at this time in behalf of the Village Council and Granville
thanked Molly Amspaugh, for the fair coverage she has given the Village during the last four years of reporting for the Advocate. Molly is leaving the Advocate and her new employer will be CETA, and she will be workingasa Public Information Specialist. The best of luck and good wishes were extended to Molly and she was invited to come back and visit anytime.
A motion to go into executive session was made by Vice Mayor Davison and second- ed by Councilmember Avery. Re:BeechwoodT/hornewood Drives Improvement. Motion carried. Time: 9: 08 P.M..
A motion to return to regular session was made by Councilmember Bartlett and seconded by Councilmember Miller. Motion carried. Time: 9: 50 P.M..
With no further business to discuss, a motion to adjourn the meeting was made by Councilmember and seconded by Councilmember Bartlett. Motion carried.
Meeting adjourned at 9: 50 p.m..
A,.
Clerk of Coun-dil
Maj140- 4%
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Attachment For Minutes of June-1, 1983
EXHIBIT "A"
Attendance Sheet
Elaine Mounsey
Alberto M. MacLan
David 0. Woodyard
Rose N. Knight
Mary Elizabeth Snelling
Fred KnaRP
Stephen Tischendorf
Barbara Marshall
William C. Russell
Sara S. Kirby
Margaret K. Santoni
Dick Lucier
Davia A., Gibbons
Patricia C. Thomas
Terry K. Hooson
Margaret Flechtner
Wm. W. Nichols
Ed N. Burdick
Yvonne Wilkenfeld
Marci McCaulay
Sita Ranchod
Jeanie Holt
Marilyn Marshall
John CreccaJ,.r.
J. Kirby Thomas
Carol Williamson
Ted Flechtner
Jean Barnes, Sentinel
Jacqueline O' Keefe
Carmen Mae Jean
Betty Appbllonio
Nancy I. Nichols
John H. Hall
Molly Amspaugh, Advocate
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i#61-, 4&5 *<rag e-2'>G-r-anville Sentinel,Thurs.M, ay 26,1983
1 Rahdom Remarks >By Steve Smith
I»4d, k,e to go on record .
as unequivocably opposed to
the prospect of village council
voting on an " endorsement"
, coafrea naubcoluetart.hfereeo'zuetc.oImdeono'tf
such a vote,I oppose even the ·
consideration of such a ' mBeaesfourreet.he proponents of the
measure hang me in effigy,let
me state that I am very much I concerned with nuclear pro- lifertion and the consequences
of a nuclear
disaster,as should be any ra- tional persod. However,I am
k,not:enthralled with thepro- r TRpcto f- a handful of folks
making an endorsement 07
TAnUvaklkind on my behaln{o,r do to. it ts fair for any group request action on such a coacated and' emotional
The people on village coun. cil were · e,lected on the premise that they were level- q
headed and intelligent enough j
to review and set policy on things lilib pay raises and pot ,'
holes. And those,quite frankly,
are the only types of decisions
I'm prepared to have
them make for me.
Secondly, the members of
council are public figures in
only an extremely limited
sense of the term,and for any
group to ask them to make a
public s"tatement"on na- tional issues of such a complex,
emotional and moral
nature is an outright invasion
of their personal privacy. ,
So to those of you who support
the nuclear freeze, take
your arguments to the proper
theatre"in Washington,D.C.
and don't delude yourselves
with the thought that a village
council should be part of your
grassroots" 'campaign. It
should not.
And to.the members of
village council I say don't
sBiEmRilamreii.snsue!rdtha-int ytohui s.tnqin4K" '% *
15FEYEEMCRioifnfed--
parameters ot the charterand
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TO: Members of the Village Council of Granville
FROM; The DenisonG/ ranville Peace Fellowship
DATE: May 27, 1983
RE: The Resolution to Memorialize Congress on the Nuclear Weapons Freeze-
Attached please find several documents which show the range of groups and the number of other cities and villages across this great nation of ours, who have endorsed the Freeze.
Also included is a pamphlet from the Freeze office in Columbus which may prove helpful to you as you think about this issue.
In Granville last summer, 508 citizens of our village signed the petition calling on the US and the USSR to call an immediate halt to the nuclear arms race as a bilateral, verifiable steD toward reducing the threat of nuclear war. The wording of the Resolution before you on Wednesday night is exactly the same athsethe wording on the petition which· was circulated throughout state of Ohio last summer.
We look forward to citizen input at the Council meeting as we joid you in deliberations around this most important issue and struggle together with its implications for our future.
Sincerely,
Pat Thomas
Co-chair
DenisonG/ ranville Peace Fellowship
NUCLEAR WEAPONS FREEZE CAMPAIGN
tional Clearinghouse
44 Lindell Blvd.,Suite 404
Louis, MO 63108
14) 533-1169
PROMINENT ENDORSERS LIST
80uttcg1
OCTOBER, 1982
The following organizations and individuals have endorsed proposals for a U. S. / U e. »'.„.
FREEZE ON THE TESTING, PRODUCTION, AND DEPLOYMENT OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS AND DELIVERY
VEHICLES as an essential, verifiable first step toward lessening the risk of nuclear
war and reducing the nuclear arsenals.*
NATIONAL &INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS
Alliance for Survival
Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers
Union
Ambulatory Pediatric Association
American Association of Colleges for
Teacher Education
American Association of School Administrators
American Ethical Union
American Federation of State, County, and
Municipal Employees
American Friends Service Committee
American Lutheran Church
American Medical Student Association
American Nurses' Association
American Pediatric Society
Americans for Democratic Action. Youth Caucus
Association of American Geographers
Benedictines for Peace
Buddhist Peace Fellowship
Business Alert to Nuclear War
Cathclic Peace Fellowship
Center for Science in the Public Interest
Child- Welfare League of America
Church Women United
Clergy and Laity Concerned
Committee for National Security
Communication Workers of America
Congregation of Holy Cross, General Council
Council for a Livable World
Disarmament Working Group, Coalition for a
New Foreign and Military Policy
Democratic Socialists of America
Dutch Interchurch Peace Council IKV)
Educators for Social Responsibilitv
Environmental Action
Environmental Policy Center
Environmentalists for Full Employment
Episcopal Peace Fellowshio
Federation of American Scientists
Fellowship of Reconciliation
Friends of the Earth
German Peace Fellowship, Executive Board
Gray Panthers
High- Technology Professionals for Peace
Humanitas International
International Association of Machinists
and Aerospace Workers, International
Executive Board
International Physicians for the Prevention
of Nuclear War
International Longshoremen' s and Warehousen
men' s Union
Jewish Peace Fellowship
14th World Methodist Council
Labor Committee for Safe Energy and Full
Employment
Lawyers Alliance for Nuclear Arms Control
Lawyers Committee on Nuclear Policy
Leadership Conference of Women Religious,
Executive Committee
League of United Latin American Citizens
Lutheran Church in America
Lutheran Human Relations Association of
America, Board of Directors
These proposals include the "Kennedy- Hatfield Freeze Resolution", S. J. Res. 163, and
ics counterpart in the U. S. House of Representatives, H. J. Res. 434; the "Zablocki
Freeze Resolution", H.J. Res. 521; the California Initative: and the freeze Drooosal
contained in the "Call to Halt the Nuclear Arms Race". THE
U///I/U #I"N"IF#"U\ W\"\86\/?\$/1
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Because Nobody Wants A Nuclear War
U.
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Mennonite Central Committee, U. S. Peace Union of Concerned Scientists Section MexicanA-merican Legal Defense &Education Unitarian Universalist Association Fund ' United Church of Christ, Office for ChurcMl•i
MNaotbioilnizaal tiAosnsemfobrlySoufrvWivomael n Religious UnitiendSFoacrmietyWorkers of America National United Food and Commercial Workers, Association of Atomic Veterand International Executive Board National Association of Social Workers United Methodist Church, Board of Church National Coalition of Cuban Americans and Society National Conference of Black Lawyers United Presbyterian Church, USA National Conference on Social Welfare United States Servas Committee, Inc. National Congress of American Indians Wilderness Society
National Council on Education for the Ceramic Women' s International League for Peace and Arts, Board of Directors Freedom National Council of Churches Women' s Action for Nuclear Disarmament National Council of La Raza Women's Strike for Peace National Education Association World Association of Religious Workers for National Federation of Priests' Councils General and Nuclear Disarmament National Tribal Chairmen' s Association World Council of Churches, Central Committee
World Peacemakers
YWCA- of the United States of America
Japanese American Citizens League
Network
New Call to Peacemaking
New Democratic Coalition
New World Alliance
North American Federation of Temple Youth
Nurses Alliance for the Prevention of
Nuclear War
Parliamentarians for World Order
Pax Christi
Performing Artists for Nuclear Disarmament
Physicians for Social Responsibility
Prolifers for Survival
Pugwash Conferences
Rabbinical Assembly, The
Reformed Church in America, General Synod
Riverside Church Disarmament Program
SANE
Service Employees International Union
Sikh Dharma of the Western Hemisphere
Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament
Sisters of Loretto
Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet,
General Chapters
Sisters of the Holy Cross
Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace
Society for Pediatric Research
Sojourners
Student National Education Association,
Representative Assembly
Society for Research and Education in Primary
Care Internal Medicine
Society for Pediatric Research
Synagogue Council of America, The
Trade Unionists for Democratic Action
Union of American Hebrew Congregations
l
To improve national and international security, tne u,lcea .bcaces duu 6-c .,
should stop the nuclear arms race. Specifically, they shodld adopt a mutual freeze on the
testing, production and deployment of nuclear weapons and of the missiles and new aircraft
desed primarily to deliver nuclear weapons. This is an essential verifiable first step
todE .. lessening the risk of nuclear war and reducing the nuclear arsenals. „,„6 t'
)
REUTIONS PASSED IN:
307 City Councils around the nation: Have endorsed CA initiative
Red Bay, AL
Eureka Springs, AR
Fayetteville, AR
Little Rock, AR
Flagstaff, AZ
Jerome, AZ
Tucson, AZ
Azusa, CA
Baldwin, CA
Cupertino, CA
Garden Grovei CA
Rialto, CA
South El Monte, CA
Arcata, CA
Atascadero, CA
Baldwin Park, CA
Davis, CA
ka, CA
gette, CA
erne, CA
Angeles, CA
Los Gatos, CA
Palo Alto, CA
Pleasant Hill, CA
Sacramento, CA
Santa Monica, CA
Stockton, CA
Ukiah, CA
San Francisco, CA
Aspen, CO
Breckenridge, CO
Durango, CO
Estes Park, CO
Georgetown, CO
Longmont, CO
Nederland, CO
Silver Plume, CO
Telluride, CO
Bloomfield, CT
Bristol, CT
Centry, CT
mington, CT
<den, CT
Plttford, CT
W. Hartford, CT
Manchester, CT
Mansfield, CT
Middletown, CT
New Haven, CT
Newlo_n_don, CT
Plainville, CT
Waterford, CT
Wilinington, DE
Gainsville, FL
Redington Beach, EL
St. Petersburg, EL
ibel, FL
anta, GA
ora, IL
Calumet City, IL
Carbondale, IL
Chicago, IL
DeKalb, IL
Evanston, IL
Glencoe, IL
Flossmoor, IL
Highland Park, IL
Niles, IL
Oak Park, IL
Olympia Fields, IL
Park Forest, IL
Rockford, IL
Urbana, IL
Wilmette, IL
Bloomington, IN
Elkhart, IN
Fort Wayne, IN
South Bend, IN
Terre Haute, IN
W. Lafayette, IN
Logansport, IN
Algona, IA
Ames, IA
Bancroft, IA
Baxter, IA
Boone, IA
Burlington, IA
Curlew, IA
Cedar Falls, IA
Des Moines, IA
Dike, IA
Earlham, IA
Ft. Madison, IA
Greenfield, IA
Hubbard, IA
Iowa City, IA
Iowa Falls, IA
Lamoni, IA
Mount Vernon, IA
Oskaloosa, IA
Tiptori, IA
Waterloo, IA
Waverly, IA
West Branch, IA
Louisville, KY
New Orleans, LA
Amherst, MA
Barnstable, MA
Brookline, MA
Colrain. MA_
Ewing, MA
Longmeadow, MA
New Bedford, MA
Northfield, MA
Northampton, MA
Pittsfield, MA
Worcester, MA
Springfield, MA
Bangor, ME
Belfast, ME
Brewer, ME
Brunswick, ME
Hampden, ME
Hollowell, ME
Kennebunkport, ME
Old Town, ME
Orono, ME
Portland, ME
Winthrop, ME
Aberdeen, MD
Baltimore, MD
College Park, MD
Garret Park, MD
Havre de Grace, MD
Sykesville, MD
Takoma Park, MD
Rockville, MD
Ann Arbor, MI
Detroit, MI
East Lansing, MI
Flint, MI
Kalamazoo, MI
Kalamazoo Twshp, MI
Saginaw, MI
Bloomington, MN
Chanhassen, MN
Duluth, MN
Fridley, MN
Minneapolis, MN
Pine City, MN
St. Cloud, MN
St. Louis Park, MN
St. Paul, MN
Two Harbors, MN
Winona, MN
Hazelwood, MO
Kansas City, MO
University City, MO
Charlotte, NC
Durham, NC
Ral ei gh, NC
Lincoln, NE
Keene, NH
Portsmouth, NH
Belvedere, NJ
Belleville, NJ
Berlin Twshp NJ
Camden, NJ
Cherry Hill, NJ
Clark, NJ
Cliffside Park, NJ
Cranford, NJ
East Orange, NJ
East Windsor: NJ
Elizabeth, NJ
Englewood, NJ
Ewing Twshp, NJ
East Brunswick, NJ
Fair Lawn, NJ
Highland Park, NJ
Jersey City, NJ
Jackson Twshp, NJ
Lawrence, NJ
Lawrence Twshp, NJ
Lincoln Park, NJ
Linden, NJ
Maplewood, NJ
Montclair, NJ
Mountain Lakes, NJ
No. Arlington, NJ
Orange, NJ
Paramus, NJ
Pennsauken, NJ
Pennsville, NJ
Piscataway, NJ
Princeton, NJ
Ringwood, NJ
Roselle, NJ
Roosevelt, NJ
South Orange, NJ
Tear:eck , NJ
Trenton, NJ
Wayne, NJ
West Orange, NJ
Willingboro, NJ
Santa Fe, NM
Las Cruces, NM
Taos, NM
Afton, NY
Athens, NY
Albany, NY
Brighton, NY
Bedford, NY
Elmira, NY
Ithaca, NY
Irondequoit, NY
Jamestown, NY
Kenmore, NY
LeGrange, NY
New York City, NY
Oneonta, NY
Pound Ridge, NY
New Castle, NY
Rochester, NY
Saratoga Springs, NY
Syracuse, NY
Utica, NY
Woodstock, NY
Reno, NV
Akron, OF. -
Ashtabula, OH
Athens, OH
Berea, OH
Bcwling Green, OH
r.h.i.4..46.0.-1*17., -2..
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Cleveland Heights, OH
Cover, CH THE
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39
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Elyria, OH
Fairview Park, OH
Gambier Village, OH
Lakewood, OH
Mayfield Heights, OH
Middletown, OH
North Olmsted,OH
New Philadelphia, OH
Oberlin, OH
Oxford, OH
Rocky River, OH ,
Shaker Heights, OH
Sheffield Village, OH
PreL'Ede' fWf#HF
a:.--:/.../
University Heights, OH
West Lake, OH
Wilmington, OH
Wooster, OH
Yellow Springs, OH
Lxpungstown, OH
Ashland, OR
Bandon, OR
Cannon Beach, OR
Estacada, OR
Eugene, OR
Harrisburg, OR
Independence, OR
Portland, OR
Seaside, OR
Allentown, PA
Doylestown, PA
Harrisburg, PA
Jenkintown, PA
Media, PA
New Hope, PA
Newton Twshp, PA
Philadelphia, PA
Pittsburgh, PA
Sheltonham, PA
Swarthmore, PA
Langhorne, PA
Middletown Twshp, PA
Upper Makefield rwshp, PA
Upper Southampton, PA
Warrington, Twshp, PA
WilkesB-arre, PA
Barrington, RI
Jamestown, RI
Lincoln, RI
amestown, RI
177 Vermont Town Meetings
107 Massachusetts Town Meetings
54 New Hampshire Town Meetincs
Middletown, RI
Knoxville, TN
Harrisonburg, VA
Bellingham, WA
Bothell, WA
Edmonds, WA
Kent, WA
LaConner, WA
Port Townsend, WA
Seattle, WA
Tacoma, WA
Winslow, WA
Emery T'wshp, WI
Charleston tiv
Carmel- By-The Sea, CA
San Jose, CA
Blaine, WA
446 -New England Town Meetings:
«Countu Councils around the country:
Alameda Co, CA
Contra Costa Co, CA
Mendocino Co, CA
If
Humboldt Co, CA
Mariposa-Co, CA
San Francisco Co, CA
Santa Barbara Co, CA
Yolo Co, CA
Summit Co, CA
Sacramento Co, CA
Pitkin Co, CO
Palm Beach Co, FL
Lecn Co, FL
Hawaii Co, HI
Blackhawk Co, IA
Hardin Co, TA
Kussuth Co, IA
Johnston Co, IA
Polk. Co, IA
Monroe Co, IN
Harvey Co, KS
State Lecislatures:
Berkshire Co, MA
Franklin Co, MA
Hampshire Co, MA
Allegheny Co, MD
Fairfax Co, MD
Harford Co, MD
Howard Co MD
Montgomery Co, MD
Hennepin Co, MN
Itasca Co, MN
St. Louis Co, MN
Pine Co, MN
Jackson Co, MO
Essex Co, NJ
Camden Co, NJ
Chautauqua Co, NY
Genesee Co, NY
Madison Co, NY
Monroe Co, NY
Suffolk Co, NY
Rocklaid Co, NY
Plus 8 statds paise
44 Connecticut Town Meetings
62 Maine Town Meetings
2 Delaware Town Mee tings
Yates Co, NY
Summit Co, OH 1
CIackamas Co, OR
Lane Co, OR
Berks Co, OR
Multnomah Co, OR
Centre Co, PA
Allegheny Co, PA
Lehigh Co, PA
Bucks Co, PA
Erie Co, PA
McKean Co, PA
Tarrant Co, TX
Loudoun Co, VA
Shenandoah Co, VA
Clark Co, WA
San Juan Co, WA
Whatcom Co, WA
Palmyra Co, ICS
d the Freeze in the november 1982
elections
The Massachusetts, Oregon, Connecticut, Hawaii, Maine, Vermont, Minnesota, Wisconsin,
Delaware, Iowa and New York State Legislau€res; the Kansas and Pennsylvania House of
sentatives, the California State Assemblgiand the Alaska, Maryland and Illinois Senates.
Referendums: 1 84-£
Ballot victories in 3 State Senatorial districts of Western Massachusetts -pov/80;
Boulder, Colcrado -Ncv/ 81; Framingham,; MA -Apr/82; Brattleboro, VT -Sept/ 82; Wi
Sept/ 82. On November 2 there will be Etatewide referendum votes on the Freeze in Arizona;
California; Oregon; Michigan, Rhode Island; ew Jersey: Montana Multilateral); North
Dakota and Washington, DC. Also on the ballot on Nov. 2 will be Chicago; New Haven, CT
Hamden, CT; Philadelphia Co; Kearney, NE; Thurston Co (Olympia, WA)W;ashoe Co (Renc
Izard Co, AK; Stone Co, AK; Independence Co, AK; Suffolk Co, NY; Meriden, CT; Butler
Erie Co, PA; Winnetka, IL; Denver, CO; Cook Co, IL; Dade Co (Miami, Fl);Nor- walk, CT;
NO. 3a=nisrd,CT; Soughbury, CT; W· ethersfield, CT; Manchester, CT; Torringo:n, CT; Springfield,
NO; and Columbia, MO. Three areas will voted on October 5 -North Star Borough
Fairbanks, AX) ;Anchorage, AK; and Juneau, AK.
Endorsements:
240 Catholic Bishogs. 109 national and international organizations have endorsed the
2-
What'§Wrong Witll Nuclear Weapons?
We' ve no reason for saying
that we will save ourselves
through the ' ilistinct for
selfp- reservatioiW.'e coil,d
destroy ourselves aiid the
world."
Margaret Mead, anthrc,I,ologist l
Alarmed by an international cliniatc th,71 i'n' creasingly presents nuclp.1 r
war as a rational possibility,s"everal hundred doctors and scientists
recently presente1( Ilie following warning to President Reagan ancl 10 Clairman Brezhnev:
1 Nitclear war. ever,a "limited"o,ie, would result in DEATI-1, INIURY
AND DISEASE on a.scale Iliat lias NO PRECEDENT in humati
1istory.
2 Medicald "isaster plannitig · fc,r nilclear war is meaningless. 1 hfire
would be NO POSSIBI_E MEDICAL RESPONSE. Most hosi,il:ils
woulcl l,e destroyed, niost niedic.al personnel dead or itiji,ievi, ni,s)t inedical supplies woulcl l,e utiavailable. Most " survivors"ivolilil
lie.
3 11ere is No [f:FIC1 IVE CIVIL DEFENSE. The 1)last, tliermal and
radiatiot, effects would Kill- EVEN THOSE IN SI-IELTERS, and
falloi,1 would reac h tl,s(e,who liacl bee,1 evacuatecl.
4 RECOVERY FROM A NLICI.EAR WAR WOULD BE IMI5(5)11}LE, 1 he ecor,omic, ccologic ancl cc,cial fabric on which hi,inan life
rests would I,c destry,)ed in the USA, the USSR and nillilf of tlie
rest of the worlcl.
5 In suin. THERE CAN BE NO WINNERS IN A NUCLWAR.
World-wide fallout wotild c.,ntaininate much of Iliebe kir
glivei,,ieiir;atlhioinngss.a,1,1 atmosl,lieric effects woukl severely dge all
Fhe i,iclear issue is not just a political issue. It is a spirittial issue as well. There are trelner,1((u,s 1„4)a,l costs to basing s"ecurity"on the
Ihieal to conu ilit mass inurdir and the willingness to il,vite Inass siticide.
I am convinced ti,at the
clitirch cannot be silent
while humaiiity faces the
threat of nuclear annihilalion.
If the church is true to
her mission,she mi,st call
for ali end to the arms
raceMi.,rl"iti -Llitlier Kilig, Jr,
But What About The Russians?
What About Our Natipnil Securityl
There is NO SECURITY in the nuclear age: there is NO DEFENSE
against nuclear weapons. Never before have the USA and the USSR
been less secure.We are both slated, if all-out nuclear war occurs, to be TOTALLY DESTROYED.
This cloes not. mean that tl,reats posed by the Soviet Union are to be
ig,Jored, nor does it mean Iliat Ihe fears and distrust which have growl,
tip on l)1(11, sides over tlie years are totally unfounded. It does mean that A RACE FOR NUCLEAR SUPERIORITY BETWEEN TI-IE USA AND THE USSR IS A RACE IN THE WRONG DIRECTION.
Tlie total explosive force of the combined nuclear arsenals of 1)oil 1atior,s is ALREADY equal to 2 0 TONS OF TN ]-for every man,
wonian and child on eartl.
A SINGLE U.S. Navy poseidon submarine carries ent,ugh destruc- live power to devastate EVERY CITY in tlie Soviet l)nion with a pi,pulation of over 1 50,000, and tl,is represents LESS 1 HAN 2%of the US force.
Nuclear War Would Mean Unprecedented Deatbs
ANERICAN DEATHS
IN MST WARS 1 -200,000 b
CA«i / 1*1
Wwl WW' **
Perea -
Vie¢nam-
J
00(00*)
li
Al
llllllll
IN A NUCIIAn
1.8 , "It 41 1 1
4 ,1 1 11&. I
t
1' . pi l
1 lit lilli
140£00),000
SOVIET DEATHS
IN FAST WARS 200000 p%e/ .. IN A NUCLEAR WAR*
ww' 1111111111 , '.. 1.' It!11 11 11!1 1 *1 11,8 1 11
crv,/ war 11 im :1.- * 11 111 , r 11! 11
11' lilli 1'1111*L U :U*H#Udll1IIll Hill
31.74)0.( U) 113.00(1000
61It-e,by USNl.ic•14 31. 4 1(4„.
Why Freeze the Arms Race?
While we build more weapo,is the Soviet Union will I,e (Ic,ing thi same. We live in a world of Il,reat and counter-threat, of force
counter-force. Both the LISA and the USSR are about to,Tiove tillew gelieration"of nuclear weapons so accurate tliat they willbeto wipe out"the weapons of the other nalici,, before tliey ate lauld And as technological advances make Illes, weapolis 111r(c, · " pthlaenlnee,nrspthaativoen to use them will be greate, a·,·„ever befr,ie. Sitc' started talking aix,ut the ne··to·;possess Ilie al,irt,o wage a nuclear w.1, a"t,ionally"and w"in it. Never i„Il,e hisic,ry of nauns have so niany plantied so calmly, or their ow,i de,nise,
I,Ievital,ly there will co,71e Ilie ino,nent of crisis when orie Ii,ition will clecil,e to push the I,iltion l,efore tlie otlier does. Aggressio,1 will be net witli retaliatio,1-Inu-re retaliatioann-d humanity Will co,Tip to judge,T,e,111, efore Il,e atc,m.
Ifyou lose,you are
a,ii)h,ilated.If you win,you stand only to lose.N (uclear)
war cotitains the germs of
double suicide."
Ge,e)ral MacArtl1),,
THE ONLY ROAD TO NATIONAL SIECURITY
IS TO REVERSE THE NUCLEAR ARMS
RACE,BUT TI-A{T CANNOT BE DONE
WITHOUT FIRST CALLING IT TO A HALT.
Althoi,gli the USA is al,c,ad in 50,Tle areas, and tlie USSR iii ouwix A ROUGI-1 BALANCE OF NUCLEAR FCR)CES NOW EXIS15. 1 hii ·xi round of Ille nuclear ,ir,7,5 race can only cre,ile new i,e,ils fc e peg,le cif the USA, tlie i,cople of the USSR, ancl for the eritite w
A Freeze is an Agreement to Stop.
To improve national and international security,
the United States and ttle Soviet Union should sic1,,thc. nuclear arms race.Specifically,they should adopt a mutual freeze on the testing,production and deployment
of nuclear weapotis aid, ofmissiles and new aircraft designedprimarily to deliver nticlearweapons. This is an essentialv, erifiable first step toward lessei,i,ig the risk of nt,clear war and reducing the ni,clear arsenals."
Frc,ti tlie " Call to I l,Ilt the Nlic-le,1,Arnis Race"
lolltw, ilig aclolitic,1, c.f, tlie Freeze, its :ernis slic,illd lie mYc,,li,ilecl ink, the nic,re I,trmal,cril foril, of a lic,ily.
C .1 A 4
Doiisil'I Military Spendilig 1-lelp 1 Citizells' Campaign for a Mlitual c9/1- k /ll<f 1(12)1/ 1
C)ur Econoniyl US/Sc,viet Halt to tlie Nuclear Arms Race
Tlliierican pco' l,le lose 1013,wl,11(1'11: lit,ily V,t,i,clitil, Is high. for tlie olisider a l)ilateral mora- 7
4,·incluslry K cal)ta,l Interixive a,icl retiuites IIglil;skilled, 1)g,l,ly t<riu,m 011 11uclear weaponf
p.c,rkers A glucly l(orie fc,r tle Mac liint<I Uliti,„in 1979, for deploymerit and testing to be
elile, 511w,)ed that If 1 1)I,lic,n Cli,Il,irs wer(t'ransferred frc1)1,military 1 tlie single ITiost crucial isfile
Iryto c ivil,an induslry. 14.0(}M{O)R[1)( 115 woulcl l,e created. If ' facilig htinianily today." 1 i
I milic)i, clollars were used l,y LI,Ile al,1 (Icc, al fic,vprn,nents to hire St,n,it,r M,irk 1-latficilil IN A 1-) EMOCI<ACY,
1,c·l.ic,·r, pc,lic r anti firenic1·,. 10.0(1(J MORI-1(11)5 wc,uld l,e create(I
R-1((6,)4)11)
il„iri if Il(,5,1,1,e i)I,lion (lollarc were ilied 1,h)irt'n,Ilitary perst)in,e|
WE Al<E Al.I IZESI-O' NSIBLE FOR
Wli,1, 'r:,.ic,t,·,i I.lic'1,1,1 ilary I )ticlic:·l ,ic ri·1. ,s(.·1 M)(S[)I IC I'ROGRAMS A mutual US/Sc,viel I reeze Ic, tlic' tiur lear I.rt,15 r.lce will l)(,c I,ii,(1, ,c(l . PUSI-{INC;1-1-11- BLI-1-F-ON.
c,nly when Ilier,·14 em6)11, lili ,1|( sul)111(1)Ic,c t(}lil,I(lli'e LISA ,ilitl tile'
51 1 (11[ Ilie c 5(,14 f(1, 1,I(i,u<Ic·1,1 .ir,114 lai ('r e. ,.ilri,I.dy killing as we i USSR Ic, i,c I (111 il, atic| a coliterle<1|11.11011,1| C,1111palgll Ir litic|t(w'.lv Ic)
11(7,1(c ·I lii,rli,in ni,c(l's- f-fic,I(, c r, „,1 Iici 4111('1(r' -1, 1urch,15( new liu- 1,1,11(1 111,5 5,11111rl(, Acrc,ic Ilie (u<,ilr,y, 13c(),11|r;,re 1,1,111,111 to 7(11, .i li,ill
C If'1, 1 V\ t'1.,1(1)1', Ill IliC, I.r,li r,i<C, 111(1111r(t', 11.1(1 1(1,|ierf, C'le(t,IC i,111%l i,lil (9,7 illivt,4
Il'.Il 1 1(rs', 9(1(Il'l 141 4, f,Ir,lierf, (arlil,11-li'rf -Re-lit !111!catis ic,1„I e)t Iic,c r,1A,
1-very gii,iliat is 111d.,e,every 1|E,r1. |·. it' i,c| c''r)115r(v,,ll,V{5' "c I-liz-ells 01 1| lis c (illnry W|1(w, ,lili 1,1 THE 2f' t ltk. .%4 4 5 '*
wrs/t,,1)111,1 ishluncl/ed, 1<e' r)' live, licY' Irc, 111 Ilw Ilirc,al of r,Licle.ir War
roc ket fired,sig,iifies iii Ilie 1
firial sers,e a tlieft frot„1 £1s(e, 14('1(Il,l lit ll, |11|4 1(1W1'r<tj| 111'V 1,1111,lili'(1'1) C,ill ,1 11,lit 1,1 1111' fi'7..5,.1-1.- Ftjj 1 8 I,l[13R)
il,1111
who huriger aridare1.f,c),1((, , vitic li'.11 1%,„r,i„c : Ap'
11K#e irho are cold ancl are 1 (- (}
NIA( l
1)N 40,11)114,1111(w(jr
1 4\
iiot ch,Ilied11, 2,4"1(1-(11'1 14*-. Wc,uld tlie Soviet U,iio[,Agree to Freeze? )_ F l+hi*salt, [Li/)
Ii, 4( '(11 111(,5(v,ic'I Unic,Ip Illrli<itp, lli,11 It Ilic, I j<A. i,trilic,werf .i l r(7'(e,,
f )1: thi, Nf w At.inli.1,1, In Pri,je, 1, A ilier ici,1 triplicl,;Servii (r_,Ii( ,A„ ti,· 15 fty
1, ilk·,I,clw,Tritlie A,11r(t'c,1)'w. cil.i, ti: (ii,ll,f lic,t,c/,„icl ic,1,reft,1,11. - Ili, Ilic rl„il,l'I Npw Yi)rk, N 1(10(3) rlie AIS(i-smic, if.1 u„inlip, c,f'.i),i.1, 1,It 1 1t:,4' „.In¢|civic citgi,,i„li„ons m )rk,i,g (i „Ilir Nlirle.r, V\f,.1. , 1)4 (1 „ir fyi ( 11.71 f']FREEZE
1 id ,;i,/NY Al¢t·ri, Arc,1
Illyhowpl Ullioll u'cilll(l 111e\' 11 t\''tv v'rl(1}14 c c,1,41,1(r,,ilici,, Iii f,10, iii
14 /1 *, i.ncl l '7)9 5(vic·1 1 jffic 1.114 I irc 11 31 14(71 a 11,111 1(I,lie tiuc 1(a'r C )11,i·,49*w#1_5 (; f tlit• }tt))f ,.11 ft}<A lF R*te |I f '(I'M/ (|11'l('| i|1' 4|1,|f ' '\1.71 |i,|,iii THEARMS
r,ic e .Ic,)Iig '11(1'Iller 1(,111(1' ,f(''/(W,c, will 11- v„pt knciw whether Ni,w Y<rk .1,id llic St.Ili· 5,3,1. itt W f) Al.9,4.1(l,ilqili .1!1(1 (e)ti*,11 Ill, (811 1.11 .\ ,1,11,Ii ,1 .
Ilic· i 1,1,1(11 l'rt,1·,,pli riati (lutic h fri,c.1, .1,, 1,1'.4,11 lil,Evci.1, 1,11|„keti,if I|,c , Mit, illhl 131(11a)(5, wc,r(,eric 1 1+it,lro%U r pul Ill(Ii'i It) tile' 1(sl' i . ti,„11.1, 91 11.i Nalic.1,.11 i(N_.li r,111 c r.f Iii.ic k Al.ty(r.'.Willl.1111 114)1.1.11.01 1'1( •1(1(1.1. 4 RACK US-USSR iIi,·1,11 1,1,1,ill„1,1,1 4/\„.0<, 31 11,i c,f M,i<Iii,111.9 l JS RA 11,·sen{i.Ii,S(l'it.ili,y C I I l.ic,11 „N ('¥L
n We I rust tlie Russians Not to 1:i, I„it I cli:I,r (1A' ),Ric 11.1, 1 1(11),134(7 (NY) I'*Ic·r Ri,cli,i,)INI) 1,Irl l l i,1„l V\ ,I.Iitit,t, 1, 111' 6' (ill,il)1,1)1, 1 fc,1 .1 millial US/Soviet Ii,ill Ic) 111<
111, R.1,,11, Ar,11„,1 LVl(,f 1„11 K A &1 ls,ii,IIi lu,Iel (c}r,glf g,1111)11 1.1,Il (17,,11'F('.11.1.,
Violate tlie Freeze? i kv„iky Lir,iic , 1'4,4,li(,1,11, 11 5{tri ic i· Ach 151(} Illl< IC'1, ),lillit, r,1(f'
111(I, re<7·e Is ver,flable l,y inc,1,19 of (1(1,(7 11(117A \'litch liolh Ihe USA I'lt·I,s(· 3,1 *I(rl, ic oupoil) 14, tile New Manli1.„1„l'i, 1) (c 'i ,4111(l,ic ,1,1 1,11 n,15 591 V ,c(
at,1(11,e l JSSI<alrealy 109(95 It,11¥c 1„1,11rws c oill1, 1,y radar, s,III'l- Ci,ii 1„1: lirc• 15 Ri,Il,crfor(l PI New 11r(k, NY 100(0),; 1,1, 1.1 r(,1,1,1(t
111(·1*1,1 1(,Ollier 1,12,115, ch(c.k Ic, iii.tki, vitc, III.it Iii,·c,tlier :1,11,0,1 K A gover1, 1, 1t(it' 01 l(ie 1}e,-
t ic kin?I:c) Ilie agree,170,11 a-s- 11w),Ii,ivi, fic,tie fi,r vill,ileroils agre(3- r[ 511 {liclc)r('tlie pr(1,,r(,1,1 fc,r .1 lJSS/ c,virl ftc,tic, 1(1 ,rim Ic'I.r \1, ·1,1 ,I(ii. pie,by tlie 1eciple 1. ,14 for
lic.,11$iii tile p,151
I'le.if,·Ii'll i,w lic,w I can g<1 '11,vi,lvi'l(iii Ilic c,111,1 a) illn
r Ilie per, lile shill,ic,1 1, er,fl,
Ile, (.1,i'on?r,11111011 of $ _ _1_,,_t„io,rt y_(ilfr wii,k ,Ii 11,(·
irc,1, 1 Clip carli,." Nric 1,ir·.Wral}17(I,rcr' /e C.i,Tilia, g,1 1
Al,r,711.1,111.111, 1(1,, 1
NAMI
11}1) 1215F
1 1.lt, / It, 1
c }RC ,ANI/A. ll(N) R()lilli (1,, inyi
1
Appendix 3 to the Basic Plan
HOST AREA
Bennington Twp.
Bowling Green Twp.
Burlington Twp.
Edin Twp.
Fallsburg Twp.
Franklin Twp.
Granville Twp.
Granville Village
Hanover Twp.
Hanover Village
Hartford Twp.
Hartford Village
Heath City
Hopewell Twp.
Gratiot Village
Jersey Twp.
Liberty Twp.
Licking Twp.
McKean Twp.
Madison Twp.
Mary Ann Twp.
Monroe Twp.
Johnstown Village
Newark City
Newark Twp.
Newton Twp.
St. LouisvilleVill.
Perry Twp.
St. Albans Twp.
Al.exandria Village
Union Twp.
Hebron Village
Was.i ngton Twp.
Utica Village
RESIDENT
POPULATION
837
1, 052
904
971
653
1, 306
7,515
3,851
2,501
926
1,080
444
6,969
961
101
2,196
1, 300
4,128
1, 197
2, 758
1. 747
5,057
3,158
41, 200
3,179
3,309
37.5
1, 128
1, 946
486
7,054
2,035
3,021
2,221
LICKING
HOSI ARLA LI, Ii. IARY LHELT
INCOMING
RELOCATEES
1, 448
1, 820
1 1, 564
1, 680
1, 130
2,259
13,000
6,662
4,327
1, 602
1, 868
768
12,056
1,663
175
3,799
2,249
7,141
2,071
4, 771
3,022
8,748
5,463
70,930
5,500
5,725
649
1, 951
3,367
841
12,203
3,521
5,226
3,842
App 3 -10
RESULTING
POPULATION
2,285
2, 872
2,468
2,651
1, 783
3,565
20,5151
10,5133
6,828
2,528
2,948
1, 212j
19,025
2,624
276
5,995
3,549
11, 269
3,268
7,529
4,769
13,8053
8,621J
112, 13A
8,679
9,034
1,024)
3,079
5, 313
1, 327
19,2571
5,5563
8,244
6,063'
3 2.C,6 C7
36,901 104,646 466,
j PF CAT. PF CAT. CONGRE. (to
0-1 2-8 CARE inc
SPACES SPACES SPACES bsm
299
64
150
685 1, 802
16,860 23,395 38,120
650 5,604
823
1, 390 7,800 27,185
1, 529
58
278
836 2,601 7,466
485
1, 995 2,540 6,484
15,715 64,128 300,
122 5,783
105 940 24,616
1,485 15,800
I
LICKING
OH OHIO
ST-CO -MCD-PLACE-RSAC
39 089 005 0000 56J 2
FAC
NO.
1970 POP 107799
BUILDING NAME·
MCD 005 BENNINGTON TWP
SLA 0001
09441 BENNINGTON ELEM SCHOOL
MCD 025 ETNA TWP
SLA 0004
01601 ETNA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
09293 ODA PLNT INDSTRY BD 1
09294 ODA FD SO FRTLZR BD 3
09295 ODA CNSMR ANLTC LB BD
09296 ODA ANML PATHOLOGY BD
09297 ODA PLNT PST CNTRL BD
09298 BBL MSSN BPTST CHRCH
09299 J<F MACHINE
MCD 035 FRANKLIN TWP
SLA 0002
01402 JACKSONTOWN ELEM SCHL
09391 BRWNSVLL UNTO MTHOST C
MCD 035 FRANKLIN TWP
SLA 0002
03539 WATER WORKS
MCD 040 GRANVILLE TWP
SLA 0005
03403 OWEN CORNING RESEARCHB
09107 CO EMERG OPER CENTER
09491 GRANVILLE HIGH SCHOOL
09709 GRANVILLE ELECTRIC PLN
SLA 0006
01801 PEOPLES BANK
01802 NEWARK TELE CO
01803 US POST OFFICE
01804 PUBLIC LIBRARY
01_805 GRANV I LLE ELEM SCHOOL .
01806 THEATER ARTS BLDG
01807 BARNEY SCI ALL DENISON
01808 DOANE LIBRARY
01809 SMITH HALL DENISON UNI
01810 CURTIS HALL WEST DENIS
01811 CURTIS HALL EAST DENIS
01812 LIFE SCI BLDG DENISON
NSS ALL FA ' Y LISTING
AS OF JUN 30, 1981
D
BLDG I
NUMBER R STREET NAME CITY
PLACE 0000 BENNINGTON TWP
VAN FOSSEN BY D BENNING
PLACE 0000 ETNA TWP
SR 310 AT SR 40 ETNA
14573 SW NATIONAL RD ETNA
NTNL RD AT TYLR ETNA
NTNL RD AT TYLR ETNA
NTNL RD, AT TYLR ETNA
NTNL RD AT TYLR ETNA
9733 SW TAYLOR RD ETNA
PK<LBRTY AT SR3 ETNA
PLACE 0000 FRANKLIN TWP
JCKSNTWN RD CSR JACKSON
NTNL RD CS R 40 BROWNSV
PLACE 1790 HEATH
70 E DORSEY MILL RD HEATH
PLACE 1625 GRANVILLE
77
69
43
13
93
FALLOUT SHELTER SPACES
ROUTE 16 GRANVIL 0
0 MI S GRNVLE S GRANVIL 85
210 NEWBURG ST GRANVIL 1
LANCASTER RD GRANVIL 0
119 E
131 E
203 E
217 E
308 N
W
BROADWAY
BROADWAY
BROADWAY
BROADWAY
GRANGER
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
COLLEGE +MULBE GRANVIL
SOUTH RD GRANDIL
SOUTH RD DENISO GRANVIL
NORTH RD GRANVIL
NORTH RD WASH D GRANVIL
NORTH RD WASH D GRANVIL
NORTH RD GRANVIL
PF
CAT
0
535
60
505
55
140
695
0
0
90 '
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
330
0
0
155
95
0
240
0
270
415
1760
0
0
0
855
0
0
0
0
0
130
295
0
0
0
0
595
RELATIVE BLAST
PROTECTION
CODE AND SPACES
PF PF PF C C
CAT CAT CAT TOTAL D FLOOR D TOTAL
1 2-3 4+ BSMT E 1-3 E BSMT
0 520
0 485
00
00
0 55
0 155
00
0 25
0
0
255
215
175
C
1250
1660
180
0
80
0
15
190
0
140
0 0 70 H
0 605 H
0 305 H
0 140 H
0 695 H
0 55 H
0 155 H
0 90 H
0 25 H
5 0 260 H
0 0 60
0
275
0
0
15
0
0H
140
155
95
255
455
175 H
400 H
0X
295 H
180 H
0E
210 E
595 H
0C
0C
0G
0C
0C
0G
0C
0C
0
0
6160 X
0
0
0
0
0
175
455
0
460
0
0
210
595
690
305
200
915
55
155
115
25
OD 200 683
0 0 81
118
142
134
284
61 3'
264
489
726
315
107
300
596
AGE 3090
CRP DESCRIP
SPACES CODE
F
1 OU
CONG. RSWS UPDT
CARE EFNE DATE
00 50 256 0 0 3 21 0676
0
0
0
0
0C
130 G
0I
0G
0G
650 X
170 G
0G
0 D0321 0975
0 80249 0975
0 80249 0975
0 80249 0975
0 BO 2 42 0975
0 80249 0975
0 E0531 0975
0 E0461 1075
0 0 3 21 0676
0 5 31 0676
0 25 0 3 43 0676
0 123
0 219
0 1925
0 70
0 4 51 0676
0 3 49 0676
A 0 3 22 0676
0 4 59 0676
0 5 55 0676
0 4 43 0676
0 1 4A 0676
0 3 26 0676
8 0 3 21 0676
E 0 4 71 0676
C 0 4 23 0676
0 0 2 26 0676
C 0 4 12 0277
C 0 4 12 0676
C 0 4 12 0676
E 0 4 23 0277
70 0
0 34
0
0 0 40 0 40 0
LICKING
OH OHIO
ST-CO -MCD-PLACE-RSAC
39 089 040 1625 56J 2
1970 POP 107799
FAC
BLDG
NO. BUILDING NAME NUMBER
MCD 040 GRANVILLE TWP
SLA 0006
01813 SWASEY CHAP DENISON 01814 TOWN U HOUSE DENISON U 01815 WHISTLER: S HOSP DENISH
01816 EAST HALL DENISON UNIV 01817 SHAW HALL DENISON UNIV 01818 BEAVER HALL W 01819 SAWYER HALL W 01820 CRAWFORD HALL
03134 GRANVILLE INN 314 E
03148 PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH BL 03192 ROLAN THOMPSON 130 E
03193 CORNER REALITY 142 E
03194 AIDAS <GRANVILLE NEWS 111 N
03195 VILLAGE BEAUTY SALON 107 N
03410 GRNVLL ELEM SPCL CLASS 210 N
09101 BLAIR-KNAPP HALL
09102 SWIMMING POOL DENISON
09104 CHEMISTRY BLDG
09105 SHORNEY HALL E 09111 MIDDLE SCHOOL 100 N
09112 FIRST PRESBY CH ED BLD 131 N 09224 PHYSICAL PLANT BLDG
09428 BURKE HALL OF MUSIC +
09449 KING HALL DENISON U 09450 KAPPA KAPPA TAU SOR 116
09451 MONONOMY 115
09452 THRIFT SHOP 118 W 09453 CENTENARY UN METH ED C 132
09455 KAPPA ALPHA THETA 200
09456 PHI DELTA THETA FRAT 09458 SORORITY CTR DENISON U 202
09459 SOR DANCE CTR DENISON 201
09460 CENTENARY UN METH CH 116 E 09461 SELLER: S EDDY INS 116 W
09462 DINING HALL DENISON U 09463 DELTA CHI FRAT
09465 DOANE ART BLDG DENISON
09467 SHEPARDSON HALL DENISO 09468 GROCERY STORE 118 E 09470 FELLOWS HALL DENISON U 09487 GILPATRICK HOUSE W 09488 DOANE ADMIN BLDG
09494 SORORITY HOUSE
09495 FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH W 09496 SORORITY HOUSE
09497 SORORITY HOUSE 136 N
NSS ALL FACl Y LISTING
AS OF JUNE 30, 1981
R STREET NAME CITY
PLACE 1625 GRANVILLE
RIDGE RD +NORT
RIDGE RD
RIDGE RD
RIDGE RD
NORTH RD
NORTH RD DENISO
NORTH RD RIDGE
RIDGE RD DENISO
BROADWAY
BROADWAY <MAIN
BROADWAY
BROADWAY
PROSPECT
PROSPECT
GRANGER ST
NORTH RD DENISO
WASHINGTON DR
SOUTH RD DENISO
NORTH RD DENISO
GRANGER ST
MAIN ST
SR 661
CHERRY ST
BURG ST
MULBERRY ST
MULBERRY ST
BROADWAY ST
MAIN ST
MULBERRY ST
FRATERNITY ROW
MULBERRY ST
MULBERRY ST
BROADWAY
BROADWAY ST
SOUTH RD
WASHINGTON RD
COLLEGE ST +BUR
RIDGE RD
MAIN ST
SOUTH RD +BURG
NORTH RD
SOUTH RD DENISO
SORORITY CIRCLE
BROADWAY
SORORITY CIRCLE
MULBERRY ST
H GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRNVILL
FALLOUT SHELTER SPACES
PF PF
CAT CAT
01
0
0
1
555
0
0
0
370
645
0
75
150
105
3S
70
0
50
300
825
0
545
220
280
220
70
70
55
70
85
350
50
165
0
240
240
260
75
50
120
100
190
40
75
545
1105
0
865
1200
350
350
1830
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1045
0
1280
1360
565
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
PF
CAT
2-3
00
0 240
00
505 0
00
00
00
1480 1065
00
225 0
00
00
00
00
00
1285 475
0 230
690 0
1840 315
195 605
305 0
00
00
00
00
00
00
70 0
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
00
465 0
00
00
00
715 0
00
00
RELATIVE BLAST
PROTECTION
CODE AND SPACES
PF C C
CAT TOTAL D FLOOR D TOTAL
4+ BSMT E 1-3 E BSMT
0E
0H
0H
0E
0E
0H
0H
1170 H
645
225
75
150
105
35
0H
475 H
230 H
325 H
0H
200 H
305
0H
0H
220 H
280 1
220 I
70
70
0I
0H
70 1
85 I
350
50
0H
0I
0H
0H
260
0H
50 1
0H
100 1
905 H
40 I
75 I
545 X
0X
310 X
360 X
360 X
1095 X
960 X
2340 X
0
0
0
0
0
0
80 X
1400 G
0G
2190 C
1950 X
0C
0
790 X
0X
0D
0D
0D
0
0
0D
0X
0D
0D
0
0
0X
1X
0X
195 X
0
0X
0D
840 X
0D
715 G
0D
220 D
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
1170
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
475
230
515
0
170
0
0
0
255
335
260
0
0
315
0
70
85
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
145
0
295
1020
80
135
PAGE 3091
CRP DESCRIP
SPACES CODE
F
OU
CONG. RSWS UPDT
CARE EFNE DATE
528
665
177
575
500
438
389
1470
626
256
69
114
61
35
20
644
179
310
652
443
226
282
339
316
275
291
79
52
157
288
105
104
204
44
1404
198
182
183
260
960
95
335
179
480
135
139
E 0 4 31 0277
8 0 2 12 0676
D 0 4 42 0676
C 0 4 12 0676
C 0 4 12 0676
D 0 4 12 0676
D 0 4 12 0676
C 0 4 12 0676
0 4 11 0676
0 5 39 0676
0 4 59 0676
0 4 59 0676
0 4 53 0675
0 4 59 0676
D 0 3 29 0676
D 0 2 23 0676
A 0 4 23 0676
C 0 2 23 0676
D 0 4 12 0676
C 0 3 22 0676
0 4 31 0676
C 0 4 23 0676
D 0 4 23 0676
E 0 4 23 0676
E 0 4 19 0676
E 0 4 23 0676
0 4 53 0676
0 4 39 0676
E 05 19 0676
E 0 4 19 0676
E 0 4 19 0676
E 0 4 23 0676
0 4 31 0676
0 4 59 0676
C 0 4 29 0676
D 0 4 19 0676
E 0 4 23 0676
C 0 4 12 0277
0 4 52 0676
C 0 4 23 0676
E 0 4 23 0676
D 0 4 23 0676
E 0 4 23 0676
E 0 5 31 0676
E 0 4 23 0676
E 0 4 23 0676
I .
D
1
L
LICKING
CH OHIO
ST-CO -MCD-PLACE-RSAC
39 089 040 1625 56J 2
FAC
NO. BUILDING NAME
MCD 040 GRANVILLE TWP
1970 POP 107799
SLA 0006
09505 THEATER BLDG
09506 FRATERNITY HOUSE
09507 FRATERNITY HOUSE
09509 FRATERNITY HOUSE
09510 FRATERNITY HOUSE
09511 FRATERNITY HOUSE
09512 CLEVELAND HALL
09514 STONE HALL APTS
09515 BAPTIST EDUCATION BLDG
09527 COLWELL HOUSE
09528 SWASEY OBSERVATORY
09529 ALUMNI MEr FIELD HOUSE
09530 BETH EDEN ADMIN OFFICE
09532 MAINTENANCE BLDG
09533 SLATTER HALL
09703 OHIO BAPTIST CONVENTIO
09705 GRANVILLE MUSEUM
09706 ST LUKES EPISCOPAL
09728 WELSHS GROCERY
09729 DEEDS FIELD STADIUM
09730 FULLERS BASKETS
09731 SARGENTS MARKET
09735 TAYLOR PHARMACY
SLA 0010
02204 UNION TWP ELEM SCHOOL
02205 COLONIAL RESTURANT BLD
03573 LICKING CO CIVIL DEF
MCD 045 HANOVER TWP
SLA 0009
02106 LICKING VALLEY HIGH SC
02107 MASONIC LDG NO 338 F+A
09508 LICKING VALLEY JR HIGH
MCD 050 HARRISON TWP
SLA 0007
01901 LICKINS HTS JR HIGH
09329 LICKING HTS ELEM SCHOO
09330 LICKINS HTS SR HIGH
NSS ALL FAC i LISTING
AS OF JUNL 30, 1981
D
BLDG I
NUMBER R STREET NAME CITY
PLACE 1625 GRANVILLE
117 N MULBERRY ST
FRATERNITY ROW
FRATERNITY ROW
FRATERNITY ROW
FRATERNITY ROW
FRATERNITY ROW
COLLEGE ST
N PLUM ST
W BROADWAY
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
RIDGE RD DENISO GRANVIL
NORTH RD
WASHINGTON DR
RIDGE ROAD
N PEARL ST
NORTH RD
137 E BROADWAY
115 S BROADWAY
111 S BROADWAY
116 E BROADWAY
NORTH RD
128 E BROADWAY
126 E BROADWAY
132 E BROADWAY
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANV I '
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
GRANVIL
CO 135 AT HWY 3 GRANVIL
HWY 37 N OF CO GRANVIL
HWY 37 N OF CO GRANVIL
PLACE 1720 HANOVER
COUNTY RD 668 HANOVER
LICKNG VALLEY 6 HANOVER
COUNTY RD 668 HANOVER
PLACE 0000 HARRISON TWP
SUMMIT RD
SUMMIT ROAD
SUMMIT RD
SUMMIT
SUMMIT
SUMMIT
0
70
125
55
170
595
165
10
65
210
1955
220
0
80
350
135
110
20
105
310
FALLOUT SHELTER SPACES
U
RELATIVE BLAST
PROTECTION
CODE AND SPACES
PF PF PE PF C C
CAT CAT CAT CAT TOTAL D FLOOR D TOTAL
0 1 2-3 4+ BSMT E 1-3 E BSMT
00
00
00
00
00
0 0
0 15
0 345
00
00
0 130
00
00
0 0
0 455
00
0 65
00
00
0 220
00
0 0
00
0 325 0
140 35 145
200 0 180
0 325
35 0
10
0 01
0 OH
0 OH
0 OH
0 OH
0 OH
0 185 H
0' 290 H
0 185 H
0 11
0 85 H
0 OH
0 210 1
0 OH
0 OE
0 220
0 65
0 /40
0 240
0 355 X
0 110
0 20
0 105
0D
440 X
395 X
440 G
520 X
485 X
790 G
780 G
260 G
0D
85 G
165 X
0D
290 X
2230 X
0
0
0
0
0D
0
0
0
65
0
0
0
0
0
1065
340
190
215
85
0
0
0
0
0
0
0.
0
300
0
0
0
RAGE 3092
CRP DESCRIP
SPACES CODE
OU
CONG RSWS UPDT
CARE EFNE DATE
H 45 C 110 336
0 0 162
0 0 277
25 H OC 435
35 0 0
OH 2175 X 0
OH OC 325
OH 570 X 0
OH 240 X 0
52
164
71
157
198
194
878
459
225
241
63
42
210
72
1069
164
56
98
197
0
111
72
84
1138
134
585
D 0 4 23 0676
E 0 4 23 0676
D 0 4 12 0676
E 0 4 23 0676
E 0 4 12 0676
D 0 4 12 0676
E 0 4 23 0676
E 0 4 12 0676
D 0 4 29 2576
D 0 4. 23 C:6·-
A 0 4 23 21 -6
A 0 4 29 7.6-
E 0 4 23 576
8 0 4 2' '3
A 0 4 2
0 5 3.
0 3 2£
0 5 3-
0 4 52
BO 4 75
0 4 52 6,
0 4 52 0676
0 4 53 0676
D 0 3 21 0676
0. 4 59 0676
0 3 49 0676
8 0 3 22 0676
0 4 79 0676
8 0 3 22 0676
0 E0322 0975
0 E0321 0975
0 C0322 0975
0 280
0 180
0 0
0 0 3
0 0
0 0
0 270 0 45
0 0 0
0 0 0
Sjbi'
CALL TO HALT THE NUCLEAR
ARMS RACE
Proposal for a Mutual US-Soviet Nuclear Weapons Freeze
To improve national and international security,the United States and the Soviet Union should stop
the nuclear arms race.Specifically,they should adopt a mutual freeze on the testing,production and
deployment of nuclear weapons and of missiles and new aircraft designed primarily to deliver nuclear
weapons.This is an essential,verifiable first step toward lessening the risk of nuclear war and reducing the nuclear arsenals.
The horror of a nuclear holocaust is universally acknowledged. Today,the United States and the
Soviet Union possess 50,000 nuclear weapons. In half an hour, a fraction of these destroy all cities in the weapons can northern hemisphere. Yet over the next decade, the USA and USSR plan to build over 20,000 more nuclear warheads, along with a new generation of nuclear missiles and air- craft.
The weapon programs of the next decade, if not stopped, Will pull the nuclear tripwire tighter.
Counterforce and other n"uclear warfightings"ystems will improve the ability of the USA and USSR
to attack the opponent's nuclear forces and other military targets. This will increase the pressure on both sides to use their nuclear weapons in a crisis, rather than risk losing them in a first strike.
Such developments will increase hairtrigger readiness for a massive nuclear exchange at a time when economic difficulties, political dissension, revolution and competition for energy supplies may be rising worldwide. At the same time, more countries may acquire nuclear weapons. Unless we change this combination of trends, the danger of nuclear war will be greater in the late 19805 and 19905 than ever before.
Rather than permit this dangerous future to evolve, the United States and the Soviet Union should stop the nuclear arms race.
A freeze on nuclear missiles and aircraft can be verified by existing national means. A total freeze
can be verified more easily than the complex, SALT I and 11 agreements. The freeze on warhead pro- duction could be verified by the Safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency.Stopping the production of nuclear weapons and weapon-grade material and applying the Safeguards to US and Soviet nuclear programs would increase the incentive of other countries to adhere to the Nonprolifera- tion Treaty,renouncing acquisition of their own nuclear weapons,and to accept the same Safeguards.
A freeze would hold constant the existing nuclear parity between the United States and the Soviet Union. By precluding production of counterforce weaponry on either side, it would eliminate excuses for further arming on both sides. Later, following the immediate adoption of the freeze, its terms should be negotiated into the more durable form of a treaty.
A nuclear weapons freeze,accompanied by governmenta-ided conversion of nuclear industries, would save at least $100 billion each in US and Soviet military spending a(t today's prices)in 1981-1990. This would reduce inflation. The savings could be applied to balance the budget, reduce traexgeiosn. sim. prove services, subsidize renewable energy,or increase aid to povertys-tricken third world also raiseBeymsphlioftyinmgepnet.rsonnel to more labori-ntensive civilian jobs, a nuclear weapons freeze would
Stopping the US-Soviet nuclear arms race is the single most useful step that can be taken now to reduce the likelihood of nuclear war and to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons to more countries. This step is a necessary prelude to creating international conditions in which:
further steps can be taken toward a stable, peaceful international order;
the threat of first use of nuclear weaponry can be ended;
the freeze can be extended to Other nations; and
sthaefenfuroclmearnuacrsleeanraldseosntruaclltisoidne.s can be drastically reduced or eliminated, making the world truly
For list of endorsers and to endorse the Freeze Proposal,see last page.
Revised April 1982
®4*39
Statement on tile Nuclear Weapons Freeze Proposal
cope of the Freeze
1) Underground nuclear tests should be suspended, pending
final agreement on a comprehensive test ban treaty.
2)There should be a freeze on testing, production and
deployment of all missiles and new aircraft which have
nuclear weapons as their sole or main payload. This includes:
US Delivery Vehicles Soviet Delivery Vehicles
In Production: in Production:
Improved Minuteman ICBM SS-19 ICBM
Trident I SLBM SS-N-18 SLBM
Air-launched cruise missile SS-20 IRBM
ALCM) Backfire bomber
In Development In Development
MX ICBM SS-17, SS-18, SS-19
Trident 11 SLBM ICBM improvements
Long-range ground-and sea- New ICBM
launched cruise missiles New SLBM (SS-N-20)
GLCM, SLCM)
Pershing 11 1RBM
New bomber
3)The number of land-and submarine-based launch tubes
for nuclear missiles should be frozen. Replacement subs
could be built to keep the force constant, but with no
net increase in SLBM tubes and no new missiles.
4)No further MIRVing or other changes to existing
missiles or bomber loads would be permitted.
ational
means of verification with high confidence.
All of the above measures can be verified by existing
The following measures cannot be verified nationally
with the same confidence, but an effort should be made to include them:
5)Production of fissionable material (enriched uranium
and plutonium) for weapon purposes should be halted.
6)Production of nuclear weapons (bombs) should be halted.
There are two arguments for attempting to include these
somewhat less verifiable steps. First, with a halt to additional
and new delivery vehicles, there will be no need for
additional bombs. Thus, production of weapon-grade fissionable
material and bombs would probably stop in any event. Second, the establishment o f a universal ban on production
of weapon-grade fissionable material and nuclear
bombs, verified by international inspection as established
now for non-nuclear-weapon states under the Nonproliferation
Treaty and the International Atomic Energy Agency,
would greatly strengthen that Treaty and improve the pects for halting the spread of nuclear pros- weapons.
The Agreement to Freeze
The US and Soviet governments should announce a oratorium on all further testing, production and deployent
of nuclear weapons and nuclear delivery vehicles, to
e verified by national means. The freeze would be folowed
by negotiations to incorporate the moratorium in a treaty. The negotiations would cover supplmentary verifi- cation measures, such as IAEA inspections; and possible desirable exceptions from the freeze, such as an occasional confidence test.
This procedure follows the precedent of the 1958-61
nuclear-weapon test moratorium, in which testing was suspended
while the USA, USSR and UK negotiated a partial
test ban treaty.
Relation to SALT Negotiations
The bilateral freeze is aimed at being introduced in the
early 1980s, as soon as sufficient popular and political support
is developed to move the governments toward its
adoption.
The freeze would prevent dangerous developments in the
absence of a SALT treaty. It would preclude exploitation
of loopholes in past treaties and, at the same time, satisfy
critics who are concerned that the SALT process may not
succeed in stopping the arms race.
The freeze does not replace the SALT negotiating process,
but should supplement and strengthen it. The freeze
could be adopted as a replacement for SALT 11 or as an
immediate follow-on, with the task of putting the moratorium
into treaty language the job of SALT III.
The Case for a Nuclear-Weapon Freeze
There are many reasons to support a halt to the nuclear
arms race at this time:
ParitTyh-ere is widespread agreement that parity exists
between US and Soviet nuclear forces at present.
Avoiding N"uclear Warfighting"DevelopmenTtshenext
generation US and Soviet nuclear weapons improve
nuclear warfighting"capabilitiethsa-t iS, they improve
the ability to knock out the enemy's forces in what is
termed a l"imited"nuclear exchange. Having such capa- bilities will undermine the sense of parity, spur further
weapon developments and increase the likelihood of
nuclear war in a crisis, especially if conflict with conven- tional weapons has started. It is of overriding importance
to Stop these developments.
Stopping the MX and New Soviet ICBMSsp-ecifically, a freeze would prevent the deployment of new and improved
Soviet ICBMs, which are expected to render US ICBMs
vulnerable to preemptive attack. This would obviate the
need for the costly and environmentally-destructive US
mobile MX ICBM, with its counterforce capability against
Soviet ICBMs. That, in turn, would avoid the pressure for
the USSR to deploy its own mobile ICBMs in the 1990s.
Stopping the Cruise MissilTeh-e new US cruise missile,
just entering production in an air-latinched version and still in development in ground-and sea-launched versions, threatens to make negotiated, nationally-verified nuclear
arms control far more difficult. Modern, low-flying, terrain-guided cruise missiles are relatively small and cheap and can be deployed in large numbers on virtually any launching platform: not only bombers, but also tactical aircraft, surface ships, tactical submarines, and various ground vehicles. They are easy to conceal and, unlike ICBMs, their numbers cannot be observed from satellites. If the United States continues the development and pro- duction of cruise missiles,the USSR will be likely to follow suit in 5-10 years; and quantitative limits on the two sides will be impossible to verify. A freeze would preclude this development.
Preserving European SecuritAy-freeze would also pre- vent a worsening of the nuclear balance in Europe. To
date, the USSR has replaced less than half of its mediumrange
nuclear missiles and bombers with the new SS-20
missile and Backfire bomber.The United States is planning
do add hundreds of Pershing 1 1 and ground-launched
luise missiles to the forward-based nuclear systems in
urope,capable of reaching the USSR. Negotiations con- eployed are likely to leave Europe with more nuclear arms
ucted after additional Soviet medium-range weapons are
n both sides and with less security than it has today. It is
important to freeze before the Soviet weapons grow to
large numbers, increasing pressure for a US response and
committing both sides to permanently higher nuclear force
levels.
Stopping the Spread of Nuclear ArmTsh-ere is a slim
chance of stopping the spread of nuclear weapons if the
two superpowers stop their major nuclear arms race. The
freeze would help the USA and USSR meet their legal and
political obligations under the Nonproliferation Treaty. It
would make the renunciation of nuclear weapons by other
countries somewhat more equitable and politically feasible.
In addition, a US-Soviet freeze would encourage a halt
in the nuclear weapon programs of other countries which
are known or believed to have nuclear weapons or nuclearweapon
technology. These are Britain, France and China,
with publicly acknowledged nuclear weapon programs,
and India, Israel and South Africa, without acknowledged
progranis.
TiminTghe-re is a unique opportunity to freeze US and
Soviet nuclear arms in the early 1980s. The planned new US and Soviet ICBMs and the US Pershing 11 and groundlaunched
cruise missile are not scheduled to enter production
until 1982 or later. The Soviets have offered to negoti- ethe further deployment of their medium-range nuclear irces and submarine-based forces. Given the pressure to Ispond to new weapons on both sides and the existing clear parity, an equally opportune time for a freeze may trecur for many years.
Popular AppeaCla-mpaigns to stop individual weapon systems are sometimes treated as unilateral disarmament
or circumvented by the development of alternative systems.
The pros and cons of the SALT 11 Treaty are too technical for the patience of the average person. In con- trast, an effort to stop the development and production of
all US and Soviet nuclear weapons is simple, straight- forward, effective and mutual; and for all these reasons it
is likely to have great popular appeal. This is essential for creating the scale of popular support that is needed to make nuclear arms control efforts successful.
Economic BenefitAslt-hough nuclear forces take only a small part of US and Soviet military spending, they do cost some tens of billions of dollars annually. About half of
these funds go to existing nuclear forces, while half are budgeted for the testing, production and deployment of
new warheads and delivery systems. A nuclear weapons
freeze, accompanied by government-aided conversion of
nuclear industries to civilian production, would yield
several important economic benefits:
About $300 billion each (at 1981 prices)would be saved
by the United States and the Soviet Union over the period
from 1981 to 1990 in unnecessary military spending.
The savings could be applied to balance the budget;
reduce taxes; improve services now being cut back; subsidize
home and commercial conversion to safe, renewable
energy resources; or increase economic aid to povertystricken
third world regions, thereby defusing some oT the
tinderboxes of international conflict.
With the shift of personnel to more labor-intensive
civilian jobs, employment would rise. At the same time,
the highly in flationary pressure of military spending would
be mitigated.
Verification
The comprehensive nature of a total freeze on nuclear
weapon testing, production and deployment (and, by
implication, development)would facilitate verification.
Long-range bomber and missile production would be
proscribed. The letter of assurance attached to the draft
SALT 11 Treaty that the USSR will not increase its rate of
production of Backfire bombers indicates not on'ly deployment
but also production of the relatively large aircraft
and missiles in question can be observed with considerable
confiddnce. While concealed production and stockpiling of
aircraft and missiles is theoretically possible, it would be
extraordinarily difficult to accomplish with no telltale construction
or supply. Any attempt would require the building
or modification of plants and the development of new
transport lines that are not operational at present. It would
also involve high risks of detection and high penalties in
worsening relations without offering any significant strate- gic advantage.
Verification of a ban on tests of missiles designed to
carry nuclear weapons can be provided with high confidence
by existing satellite and other detections systems.
Here, too, a comprehensive approach is easier to verify
than a partial or limited one.
Verification of aircraft, missile and submarine deployments,
by speci fic quantity, is already provided urider the
terms of the SALT Il and SALT 1 Treaty language. Verifying
no additional deployments or major modifications will
be considerably easier, in fact, than checking compliance
ewnitvhirosnpmeceifnict. numerical ceilings in a continually changing
Verification of a comprehensive nuclear weapon test
ban, the subject of study and negotiation for many years, has been determined to be possible within the terms of the existing draft comprehensive test ban treaty.
Initiatives Toward the Freeze
Either the United States or the Soviet Union could initiate movement toward the freeze by taking modest, unilateral steps that miloauldr: demonstrate its good faith, start movement in the right direction, and make it easier for the other country to take a r exasmtepple., either country could:
Undertake a three-month moratorium on nuclear test explosions, to be extended if reciprocated. 2. Stop further deployment, for a specified period, of one new strategic weapon or improvement of an existing weapon. 3. Draw up and publish comprehensive conversion plans for the nuclear facilities and employment that would be affected by a freeze, as a sign of serious commitment to the goa.
Endorsen of a Bilateral Nuclear Weapons Freeze ( partial list)
Bella Abzug,President
Women USA *
Annual Meeting of American Baptist Churches
oan Baez, Singer
Hans Bethe, Nobel Laureate, Prof. Emeritus
ornellU.*
T.Berry Brazelton, M.D. Pediatrician
viv Helen Caldicott, M.D.,President
Physicians for Social Responsibility*
131 Catholic Bishops
Richard Celeste, former Director
US Peace Corps*
Owen Chamberlain,Nobel Laureate,
Professor of Physics
U.of CA,Berkeley-
Church Women United
Council for a Liveable World
Arthur Macy Cox,
American Committee on East-West Accord*
Harvey Cox, theology
Harvard University*
Bishop James Crumley, President
Lutheran Church in AmericaL (CA)*
Frank Currano,New Haven, CT
Central Labor Council*
Freeman Dyson,Institute ofAdvanced Studies,
Princeton.N.J.*
Richard Falk, International Law
Princeton U.*
Bernard Feld, Editor-in-Chief
Bulletin ofAtomic Scientists*
Friends of the Earth
eymour Maxwell Finger,
ormer Ambassador to the UN
Roger Fisher, Williston Prof. of Law
Harvard U.*
Mayor John Ford
Tuskegee,AL*
Randall Forsberg,President,
Institute for Ddense D &isarmament Studies*
14th World Methodist Council
Miriam Frielander,
N.Y.City Councilwoman*
John Kenneth Galbraith,economics
Harvard U. *
Ed Gray, Director, N.J. Region 9,
United Auto Workers*
LaDonna Harris, Native American activist
VP Candidate.Citizen' s Party 1980*
Theodore Hesburgh, Pres.
Notre Dame U.*
High-Technology Professionals for Peace
Archbishop Iakonos,Greek Orthodox
Diocese ofNorth S&outh Americao
Rev. William A. Jones, Jr.,past president
Progressive Black Baptist Conv.-
Alan Kay, Founder and former president
Auronetics*
Rev. F.D. Kirkpatrick,
Black Theology Project of America
George Kistiakowsky, former
Science Advisor to Presidents
Madeline Kumin, Lieutenant Governor, VT
Labor Committee for Safe Energy and
Full Employment
Betty Lall, Arms Control Expert
Cornell University*
Rear Admiral, US Navy (ret)Gene R. La Rocque,
CenterforD« fense Information•
Joseph E. Lowery, Pres.
Southern Christian Leadership Conference*
National Assembly of Women Religious
National Association of Social Workers
National Conference of Black Mayors
National Council of Churches
National Federation of Priests Councils
Nurses Alliance for the Prevention of Nuclear War
Linus Pauling,Nobel Laureate,Chem.
Physicians for Social Responsibility
Archbishop John R. Quinn (Catholic)
San Francisco Diocese,CA*
Bonnie Raitt, Singer
George Ratkiens,Arms control expert
Massachusetts Inst.of Technology*
Rabbi Alexander Schindler, President,
Union ofAmerican Hebrew Congregations-
State Senator Richard Schneller,CT
Archbishop Daniel Sheehan (Catholic)
Omaha Diocese,NEPaul
Simon,Musician
Sojourners
Trade Unionists for Democratic Action
Union of American Hebrew Congregations
Unitarian Universalist Assoc.
United Presbyterian Church,USA
Maurice M. Veneri, Pres.
NJ Industrial Union Council*
Victor Weisskopf,Physics
Massachusetts Inst.of Technology*
Ralph Weymouth,Vice-admiral US Navy (ret)
William Winpisinger, President,
International Assn.of Machinists*
Herbert York,Former Director of US
Ddense Research and Engineering
YWCA OF USA
Iorganizations for identificadon only
Action Suggestions
1. Endorse the Freeze Proposal by checking the box below and sending in the coupon. Make copies of the Call and send them to three friends.
2. Identify three leaders in your community. Send them the Call and follow up by telephone or in person. Send names of prominent
endorsers you secure to the address below.
3. Get the organizations to which you belong to endorse the Freeze Proposal and send a letter stating support to the address below.
4. Use a petition-format of the Freeze Proposal for house- to-house and large-meeting canvassing and to gather names and funds for local
newspaper ads calling for a bilateral nuclear weapons freeze.
5. Initiate town, city, county, and state government resolutions,or local and statewide referenda,in support of the freeze.
6. Create a citizens' group to take petitions, resolutions and other expressions of support for a freeze to discuss with your Representative,
Senators and Governor. Learn their opinions and work for their support and endorsement of the freeze.
Mail the coupon below to the local contact listed. If none is listed,mail to:
Nuclear Weapons Freeze Campaign,National Clearinghouse,4144 Lindell Blvd.,Suite 404,St. Louis, MO 63108.
Contact
0 Yes, I endorse the Proposal for a US-Soviet Nuclear Weapons Freeze.
0 I also support the United States taking one or more of the independent initiatives to start movement toward a Freeze (See Page 3).
0 You may use my name in printing and publicizing the Freeze ando/r the initiatives, as indicated above.
O I am enclosing a contributionof 1- 0$,2 -5 $,-1_0 0$O,t h-er )to(support this effort.
Please sendme _ .a d d-iti-o_nal copies of the Call. cost: 10¢each.
Note: Bulk orders, 50 or more, should be addressed to the NWFC/ National Clearinghouse,at the address above.)
Name
Address
City, State, Zip Tel.
Organization and Title. if any
Unless you indicate otherwise,organizations will be listed for identification purposes only.) 1

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