Granville Community Calendar

Council Minutes August 19, 1987

REGULARLY SCHEDULED COUNCIL MEETING
VILLAGE OF GRANVILLE
AUGUST 19, 1987
CALL TO ORDER
Mayor Gallant called the meeting to order at 7: 30 p.m..
ROLL CALL
Responding to roll call were:
Councilmember Rader
Councilmember Garrett
Councilmember Avery
Councilmember Eisenberg
Vice Mayor
Mayor
Law Director
Manager
Davison
Gallant
Munro
Plunkett
Vice Mayor Davison moved to excuse absentee member Schnaidt.
Motion seconded by Councilmember Garrett. Motion carried.
PUBLIC HEARING
A public hearing was held at this time for Ordinance No. 21-87,
An Ordinance To Amend Ordinance No. 27-86 Providing For Adjustments
Of The Annual Budget For The Fiscal Year 1987 And Revising
Sums For Operating Expenses."
No one appeared to speak for or against this ordinance. Manager
Plunkett gave a brief explanation of this ordinance. Public
hearing closed at 7: 36 p.m..Action on this ordinance was held
for old business.
MINUTES
August 5, 1987 -Regular Council Meeting -Vice Mayor Davison
moved that the minutes be approved as submitted. Motion seconded
by Councilmember Eisenberg. Motion carried.
CITIZENS' COMMENTS
Those who signed the register were:
B. E. Mason
Bill Nichols
George Williamson
C. Arthur Morrow
No comments, concerns, or questions were voiced at this time.
MAYOR' S REPORT
The Mayor' s Report for the month of July was presented and
reviewed. A copy of that report is hereby attached as part of
these minutes.
Council Meeting Minutes
Village of Granville
August 19, 1987
Page 2 of 4
MANAGER' S REPORT
The Manager' s Report for the month of July was presented.
Manager Plunkett reviewed the report with members of Council. He
then added the following additional items of information and/ or
comments: General Fund Balances are moving in a positive direction,
however the Street Department is not holding its own: he
recommended that Council consider passing legislation that
allows local municipalities to apply a $5. 00 permissive tax fee
on vehicle license tags. This fee would come directly to Village
coffers, and would be earmarked for road improvements. Manager
Plunkett stated that if Council was interested, that the legislation
would have to be introduced and passed in September. He
noted, that this particular legislation could not be an emergency measure.
Following discussion, Council directed the Manager to draft
the permissive tax fee legislation for the first meeting in
September.
Manager Plunkett also mentioned that there is a serious
storm sewer problem on Chapin Place. He recommended that Council
consider having a solid engineering study done in this area.
Mr. Plunkett also mentioned that he will be meeting with
Archie Shafer and Keith Newhouse (at the same time),to work out
some solution to the storm sewer drainage problem between their
properties.
Mr. Plunkett further reported that Ed Smith' s storm sewer
tiles have been repaired. The storm sewer water that goes in this
storm tile will eventually be diverted to the pipe that will be
installed between Shafer &Newhouses' property. He explained that
Mr. Smith' s driveway is not finished at this time, because the
dirt has not settled enough to complete the job.
Five of the six homes on West Broadway tested and found to
be polluting storm sewer water have obtained sewer taps.
Councilmember Rader moved to approve the Manager' s Report.
Motion seconded by Councilmember Avery. Motion carried. of the A copy Manager' s Report is hereby attached as part of these minutes.
COMMITTEE REPORTS
Development Commission -Councilmember Avery stated that he did
not attend the Commissions' Meeting of August 13, 1987, and would report on that at the next regular meeting. He reminded everyone of the Commission' s public hearing scheduled for August 20,
1987, at 7: 30 p.m.,on the new boundaries of the Architectural Review District.
Manager Plunkett added, that the Development Commission has
determined that the public hearing held July 23, 1987, on the
Shurtz-Shepardson II Conditional Use was invalid due to improper
Council Meeting Minutes
Village of Granville
August 19, 1987
page 3 of 4
notification to all property owners within 200 feet of the
property, and; Conditional Use was denied based on Mr. Cooper' s
letter in which he responded to questions asked by the Commission
with regard to the Shurtz/ Shepardson proposal. Mr. Shurtz will
return with a revised proposal. A copy of Mr. Cooper' s letter is
hereby attached as part of these minutes.
OLD BUSINESS
Ordinance No. 21-87, "An Ordinance To Amend Ordinance No. 27-86
Providing For Adjustments Of The Annual Budget For The Fiscal
Year 1987 And Revising Sums For Operating Expenses", was moved
for adoption by Councilmember Garrett. Motion seconded by Vice
Mayor Davison. Roll call vote: Garrett-yes, Davison-yes, Averyyes,
Eisenberg-yes, Rader-yes, Gallant-yes, Schnaidt-absent. Six
yes votes, one member absent. Motion carried. Ordinance No.
21-87 duly adopted.
George Williamson/ Rama, Nicaragua
George Williamson, Pastor for the First Baptist Church of
Granville, appeared this evening in response to Council' s invitation,
to hear his ideas and suggestions as to how he feels
Council might further kindle the relationship of a foreign sister
village, such as Rama, Nicaragua. Bill Nichols was also present
to add his support to Mr. Williamson' s proposal.
Members of Council had previously received a copy of Mayor
Gallant' s letter to the Mayor of Rama, Nicaragua, and; a translated
copy of his response.
Mr. Williamson distributed copies of some background
information on people who after graduating from Denison University
had gone to Nicaragua to do missionary work. Others, were
involved in public health care, and others in fields such as
music, relief and development, transportation, translation work,
etc..Mr. Williamson also provided Council with a list of
concerned citizens from Granville who are involved in the Sister
City of Rama, Nicaragua. He explained to Council the living
conditions of the people of Nicaragua, and especially those of
Rama. He felt that Council' s role would be more of a symbolic
nature than a participating one. He felt those concerned citizens
of Granville who go there, might expect to be greeted by the
officials of Rama as citizens of a sister village established
through it' s legislators, and; one which might perhaps facilitate
private exchanges among the citizens of Granville and Rama.
A lengthy questions and answer session was conducted among
members of Council, Mr. Williamson, and Mr. Nichols. Following
the session, consensus of members was, that they did not feel
they should be involved with an area that is in the middle of a
civil war, where a highly politicized situation exists. If
Council Meeting Minutes
August 19, 1987
Page 4
Council officially established a relationship with the ruling
government there, it might look as though Granville were taking
sides, and might counter what efforts Mr. Williamson and other
concerned citizens of Granville are trying to do. Council felt
that their efforts should be more on a people to people basis,
not with the two government bodies. Mr. Williamson said he
appreciated Councils comments and withdrew his proposal. He said
he would consider bringing a different kind of proposal to
Council at a later date.
MEETING ANNOUNCEMENTS
August< 234 1987 -Development Commission Hearing -7: 30 P.M. -
Public haring on the proposed expansion of the Architectural
Review District boundaries.
ADJOURNMENT
Councilmember Rader moved that the meeting adjourn. Motion
seconded by Councilmember Eisenberg. Motion carried.
Meeting adjourned at 8: 21 p.m..
3il,1112
Crerk- ofYouhbil
ALt-/441 Mafot
L. JAMES GORDON
DONALD M. BYRD
MARTIN D. ALTMAIER
GLENN A. WHITE
A. TERRANCE TRENEFF
STEVEN T GREENE
JAMES R. COOPER
JOHN W. NOECKER
WILLIAM D. KALFS
E. CLARK MORROW, COUNSEL
Mr. Douglas Plunkett
Village Manager
Village of Granville
118 South Main Street
Granville, Ohio 43023
Re: Shepardson II
Dear Doug:
MORROW, GORDON &BYRD
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
33 WEST MAIN STREET
P. O. BOX 4190
NEWARK. OHIO 43055-8190
TELEPHONE
NEWARK (614) 345-9611
COLUMBUS (614) 221-4810
August 12, 1987
Following Village' my return from a week' s vacation, I reviewed the Realty Dsevfeilloepmeonnt the Shepardson project originally proposed by have had Company and continued by Shurtz Companies. I However, no personal involvement with these matters in the past. as I advised you on the telephone I have in the past had Canomapattnoiersneyc- lient relationship with Earl Shurtz and Shurtz continuing on unrelated matters, although there is presently no Shurtz attorneyc- lient relationship with either Earl or Companies. Our law firm represented Realty Development Company when Earl Shurtz and Bob Weakley were principals in that ccoomnptiannuyi.ngJimbaGsiosr.don of our law firm represents Bob Weakley on a
I noted when reviewing the Village' s file in this matter that there was correspondence from Art Morrow and Bob Erhard of our law firm in 1980 and 1981 to Robert Drake, then Director of Law for the Village of Granville concerning this matter. It Rapepaeltayrs that our law firm, by Art and Bob, were representing Development Company at that time in connection with this project. Art left our firm at the end of 1981. Bob joined Art in the practice of law a year later and also left our firm.
The file also reflected that John Noecker, as Director of pLarwojfeocr t the Village of Granville, also was involved in this involvemenotn. Jobhenhiaslf of the Village prior to Mr. Drake' s currently a partner in our law firm.
In addition to all of the above, I was a member of the Granville Development Commission from early 1982 until the end of 1985. During my tenure on the Granville Development Commission, I
r
do not recall that the Commission was involved with this project.
I spoke with Earl Shurtz to see if he had any objection to
my advising the Village with respect to the current issues
involved with the Shepardson project. Earl stated that he had no
objection. Neither Jim Gordon nor Bob Weakley expressed objection any to my involvement. I understand from you that none of
the Development Commission members nor members of Village Council
have expressed any objection to my serving in the capacity you requested. However, I wanted to disclose to you, members of
Village Council, and members of the Development Commission all of the above matters since some of the above has come to my attention subsequent to my review of the file.
I request that you make these matters known to members of
Village Council and the Development Commission. If there is still
no objection to my advising the Village on these questions, I will proceed with the task at hand.
JRCv/s
Sincerely yours,
MORROW, GORDON &BYRD
prf 6' rv// James R. Cooper
MORROW, GORDON &BYRD
L. JAMES GORDON
DONALD M. BYRD
MARTIN D. ALTMAIER
GLENN A. WHITE
A. TERRANCE TRENEFF
STEVEN T. GREENE
JAMES R. COOPER
JOHN W. NOECKER
WILLIAM D. KALFS
E. CLARK MORROW, COUNSEL
Village of Granville
118 South Main Street
P.O. Box 514
Granville, Ohio 43023-0514
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
33 WEST MAIN STREET
P. O. BOX 4190
NEWARK, OHIO 43055-8190
TELEPHONE
NEWARK (614) 345-9611
COLUMBUS (614) 221-4810
August 13, 1987
Attention: Douglas Plunkett, Village Manager
Re: Shepardson II
Dear Mr. Plunkett:
Pursuant to your request, with Village the consent of the Granville Council and the Granville Development Commission, that I serve as Adjunct Law Advisor with respect to certain legal questions arising out of a proposed project, Shepardson II, I have responded below to the various questions set forth and have expressed opinions where appropriate. Prior to the preparation of my responses and opinions, I reviewed the Village of Granville files on the Shepardson project which you provided to me, pertinent zoning ordinances in effect for 1973 to the present, land subdivision regulations in effect for the Village of Granville, and other pertinent laws. Prior to your request that I serve in the aforementioned capacity, I had no personal involvement with this project or the issues now presented.
It appears that preliminary approval was given to a plan for tuhneit original Shepardson pkoject in 1973 and approval for a 45 complex was granted by the Development Commission in 1974. Mpey rmreitviefowr othfe the files does not show that a conditional use preject was issued until 1979 which, pursuant to Article 13, paragraph 4( e) of the Granville Zoning Ordinance, dated February 2, 1977, expired automatically if the conditional use was not commenced within two years of the grant of the permit. It further appears that the developer commenced construction pursuant to the approved conditional use in 1981, shortly prior to the expiration of the two year period. There now appears for consideration an application filed on behalf of Shurtz Companies for a conditional use permit in order to modify the existing plan. The application proposes 26 units in addition
to the currently existing 10 unit condominium development. Of the
new 26 units, 24 are proposed as rental units and 2 as
condominium units. The proposal recites that 12 buildings will
house the 24 rental units. The new proposal, therefore, calls for
a total of 36 units.
Based upon my review of the existing and prior zoning
ordinances applicable to the Village of Granville, the project
may proceed in accordance with the originally approved plan as a
conditional use without further approval. However, any proposed
changes to the originally approved plan require that the
proposals be submitted to the Development Commission under the
chapter of the zoning ordinance which provides for conditional
uses.
Responses to specific questions are as follows:
1 Does the creation of condominiums constitute
subdivision?
a land
The creation of condominiums pursuant to Ohio law does not
constitute a land subdivision. Condominium property is governed
by the provisions of Chapter 5311 of the Ohio Revised Code.
Section 5311. 02 of the Ohio Revised Code provides in pertinent
part as follows:
Neither the submission of property to the provisions
of this chapter, nor the conveyance or transfer of a
condominium ownership interest constitutes a
subdivision within the meaning of, or is subject to,
Chapter 711 of the Revised Code.
A 1986 Opinion of the Ohio Attorney General provides that
pursuant to Revised Code Section 5311. 02, condominium property is
exempt from any platting requirements that may be imposed under
Revised Code Chapter 711, and, as a result, a regional planning
commission has no authority to review condominium plats. OAG NO.
86-074. Of course, when property is submitted to the provisions
of the Ohio Revised Code on condominiums, the appropriate Ohio
Revised Code provisions must be followed and various recordings
filed for public record. The creation of condominiums does not
exempt the property from local zoning regulation in terms of the
use of the property. I am simply stating that condominiums are
creatures of specific Ohio Revised Code provisions, with special
platting requirements, and do not constitute a land subdivision
in the sense of the Land Subdivision Regulations applicable to
Granville.
It is my understanding that the land upon which this project
sits remains as a single parcel owned by a single entity. Please
refer to the definition of "subdivision" in Article II of the
Land Subdivision Regulations. If this parcel of land is
subsequently divided into two or more parcels, sites, or lots,
public streets are created, or other matters occur which are
described in the definition of "subdivision,"appearing in the
Land Subdivision Regulations, then it is conceivable that a
subdivision could exist notwithstanding the existence
condominiums on one of the parcels. However, as now proposed,
appears that there is only one parcel of land and no subdivision.
While I find no legal precedent on the question of whether a
zoning code applies to the overall borders of a condominium
building or with respect to each condominium unit, it appears
that both the 1977 Zoning Ordinance and the new codified
ordinances favor a building, as opposed to a unit approach. For
instance, the definition of "Dwelling Multi-Family" in both
volumes employs the language "a building consisting of three or
more dwelling units including condominiums with varying
arrangements Of entrances and party walls (emphasis added)."
Neither volume distinguishes between condominiums and apartments
in the definition of multi-family.
2. The Harden & Reid drawing of the project shows two
separate properties: the land occupied by the existing
condominium units with attendant accessory buildings, and the
land occupied by the proposed apartments. Are these subdivided
parcels separate, one from the other? If so, does the density for
each piece take on a separately derived ratio of units per acre?
As indicated above, neither the 1977 Zoning Ordinance nor
the recent codification distinguishes between condominiums and
apartments in its concept of "multi-family dwelling."Therefore,
in my opinion, there is only one parcel of land as presently
constituted. A "parcel" in this sense is determined by deed or
plat and not by an architect' s drawing. Therefore, in my opinion,
the property should be considered as a single parcel when
determining density as defined in the definition section of the
ordinance.
3. As stated by Mr. Harden, the uni
duplexes, tied together solely by roof str
virtue of the roof connections, multi
according to Jack Prior, Newark Building C
therefore subject to building inspection.
ts in the project are
uctures. They are, by
family/ multi-units,
ode Administrator, and
In my opinion, these are multi-family units and building
inspection requirements applicable to multi-family units apply.
4. What are the notice requirements for a hearing on a
conditional use application?
Notice requirements are set forth in 1145. 04 of the codified
ordinances. Notice must be given to "property owners within 200
feet of the property on which the conditional use is to be
considered."It is unclear as to whether a condominium unit owner
who resides on the property where the conditional use is to be
considered must be notified and I am aware of no legal precedent
on the issue. In my opinion, in order to allow these owners the
of
it
opportunity to speak on the subject, and because of the unclear
nature of the ordinance in this regard, they should be notified.
5. The Zoning Ordinance prohibits front yard parking in the
SRD, and it also requires 2 parking spaces/ dwelling unit. The
proposed change to Shepardson II shows parking for 2 cars/ unit,
one in the attached garage, and one outside, ostensibly in each
unit' s front yard. Again, the question of what constitutes the
front yard" arises. Does the stricture apply to the overall
project, or to each unit?
As stated above, neither the 1977 Zoning Ordinance nor the
recent codified ordinances appear to distinguish between
condominiums and apartments when employing the "multi-family"
concept and the "building" approach seems favored, not a
condominium/unit approach. Similarly, in reviewing 1163. 03
pertaining to development standards in the Suburban Residential
District, which discusses parking', the emphasis appears to be on
buildings, not units. Therefore, in my opinion, the "building"
approach should be employed as a standard when considering the
parking question, i.e.,a building has one front yard and no
parking is permitted within the front yard setback.
In considering the application for conditional use, the
Development Commission must address at public hearing each of the
criteria for approval set forth in 1145. 03 of the codified
ordinances.
JRCv/s
Please advise me if I can assist further.
Respectfully submitted,
UIES43>«AGp. j
JamesR\I Cooper
i
PUBLIC MEETINO
Re: Extension of Architectural Review
Tlie public meeting of
Chairman William Wernet.
August 20, 1987 was called to order by
Present on behalf of the Development Commission:
Chairman Wernet, H. Shapiro, J. Morey, 11. Sargeill,,P. Sargent, C.
Avery.
Also present: Zoning Inspector Mark Zarbaugh, layor '1't(it, (la l. latil:
and Councilman Sam Schnaidt.
A copy of the visitor registration is attached hereto.
Chairman Wernet introduced the members of L 1,p. Development
Commission and outlined the basis for the proposal, to exteNd the
Architectural Review area within the Village. 1, 11 e t·OC)53€3(]8171
was shown on the wall map and the proposal opened for (its(Juss].ott.
The following issues, concerns and suggestions were raised al; tlie
public meeting:
1. Request that the Architectural Review Ordl,Innee 1)3 ( 1111()'e
specific with regard to, a) exactly what can aid cainiot be Jolie
in the Architectural Review area; b) who must come und apply for
architectural review; and c) what is tlie timetable for
Architectural Review?
2. Chris Avery indicated that Architectural Review 18 tiot n
ne w concept for the Village, but is a procedure which has n
proven track record and which has not been plagued wit,1, Iwoblems.
Architectural Review has been in existence since 1976.
3. Suggestion that applications for Archilecturnt Review,
where public hearings is not required, be acted oii wit.hlii t.hit·Ly
30) days or automatically are granted.
4. Concern as to how
Development Commission Will
subjective and balanced board.
tlie citizens en be sure 1-11111. the
Continue to be a reasonably
5. Conaern that the proposal Was an exiension of taste
control and the assertion that the properly iii the areas to lie
included were' of different uses than those presently within the
Architectural Review.
6. Specify that meetings of tlie Deve]0/mietit Commission be
held on the second and fourth Thursdays of the t,ioitth.
1
7. Citizen resented
do with his property.
anyone telling him what he was goilig to
8. Indication that there is presently 0 written document
which represents the proposal for extet,91011 for Archi. 1.ecturaL
Review and that it was the purpose of the public meeting to
gather information so that the Development CO!111111991011 CE}111(1
formulate such a document and forward ie to the Coutic:1 | 1 or a
public hearing and consideration by Council.
9. Request that we be more specific as to f
what areas are
included in the Architectural Review area.
10. Expression supporting not only extensi. 011 of Ai·clill,ectural
Review but stricter zoning throughout the Village areas.
11. Concern that in those suburban residential distriots tlint
would be included in Architectural Review, in S(3111(3 inst,aNces, Lwo
2) hearings would be required if a person 11,1(1 1,0 apply for a
variance to the Board of Zoning Appeal.s a1,Il theti come for
Architectural Review to the Development Commission.
12. Consensus of support for including opposite sides of
existing Architectural Review streets.
13. Indication that Mount Parnassus area. was ot suggested or
proposed to be included in the Architectural Review.
14. Issue of dealing with corners of streets where 01)ly. l'ai·L
of the intersection would be included in Architectural Review.
15. Discussion regarding Architectural Review, Zoittlig aticl
student housing.
16.
17.
Discussion regarding parking and off-street parking.
Continued consensus that Architectural Review has worked
and that it has a proven track record.
Meeting was adjourned.
Next Development Commission Meeting will be held August 27, 1987
at 8: 00 p. m.
8/24/87
rt.
2
1
1987 . .H e r e." No One Surrenders"
Rama, 4 April 1987
To: the Honorable Thamas F. Gallant, Mayor, etc.
Dear Sir:
I received your letter dated 9 March 1987 and am happy to
learn that important individuals are writing to us in the interests
of friendship, which the people of Nicaragua and in particular of
Rama so greatly need.
The city of Rama is the center of the municipality of the same
name; it has an area of 6,200 square kilometers for a population
of 48,000 inhabitants.
In the winter there are torrential rains which generally
flood the banks of the rivers and which promote a rich vegetation.
The main crops of the municipaltiy are corn, beans, rice,
bananas, and various tubers. Cattle and other domestic animals are
also raised; most of the territory is covered with dense forest.
Rama is located in the Department of Central Zelaya, 300
kilometers from the capital Managua.
In this region [i.e.,Ramas],o far from major cities and
forgotten (or ignored) for nearly two centuries, one sees the
economic backwardness in which the population lives; with the
triumph of the Nicaraguan Revolution great efforts are being made
to raise the people' s standard of living; to give a few examples,
we have built a hospital, two pharmacies, 40 schools, and five
health centers [clinics?I]n. addition, we have reduced the illiteracy
rate and have improved the technology of our farming and
cattle raising.
We have also campleted a series of minor public works improvements,
such as [construction of] market places, drainage systems, ditches, sidewalks, etc. And it is our intention' to do more. Nonetheless,
we have the great limitation posed by the war, which impedes
the normaf development [pursuit] of our tasks.
The post of mayor of the municipality of Rama means intensive
work, given the many problems that must be solved. I was named
mayor on April 12, 1985, having been elected to perform this difficult
task at a meeting of the entire community which took place in the municipal stadium.
And I am awaiting the elections that will take place in the
middle of 1988, in which I will be one of several candidates and
it will be the people who will (either) replace me with someone else
or may reelect me, in accordance with the law of our Constitution.
I am a primary school teacher, I belong to the Catholic Church,
before being mayor I worked as a preacher [priest] for twelve years,
and at present in addition to my post as mayor I am a member of the
Association for the Development of the Peoples of the World, P"opular'um
Progresium."And although many are my tasks, I still give a little
time to my studies, to a course that I am now taking at the University
of Nicaragua.
May this letter be the beginning of a constant communication
between your people and ours; our main desire is to establish [a]
brotherhood because we are sure that through unity it is easier to
achieve peace.
On behalf of my people, greetings to all those who work in your
village government.
Le saluda muy atentamente:
a typical close, like "Sincerely"]
Samuel Mejfa Pefia
Municipal Mayor
Rama, Zelaya Central
2-
1
OFFICE OF MANAGER
116£9£&ofs n*ulD:E
118.SOUTH MAIN STREET
P.O. BOX 514
GRANVILLE, OHIO
43023:0514
To the Honorable Mayor of El Rama:
Greetings from Granville, Ohio, U. S.A.
March 9, 1987
I am writing as Mayor of the Village of Granville to determine your
interest in establishing a "Sister/Friendship City" relationship with our
community. Such a relationship could lead to a better mutual understanding
between our countries and citizens and a sharing of concerns and problems.
This might eventually be accomplished by an exchange of delegations, information
disseminated by our respective newspapers and other media, and
activities supported by our business communities, churches, and other local
organizations.
Granville is located in central Ohio twenty-five miles east of our state
capital, Columbus. Our population consists of about 2,000 Village residents
and approximately 2,000 students who attend Denison University during the
fall, winter, and spring months. The University is Granville' s largest
business", though two research laboratories are located nearby, many ofwhose
employees live here and take an active part in the community. Granville has a
number of smaller businesses and quaint shops which are located in our central
business district. The Village was settled in 1805 and takes great pride in
its historical heritage.
PHONE 11?1918?
Several churches play an important role in the life of Granville. One of
the pastors, the Reverend Dr. George Williamson, told me that he had a good
talk with you when he visited Nicaragua recently. He shared with me the fact
that you had been a seminary student at one time.
The position of Granville Mayor is not a full time position. I am em- ployed as a Professor of Education (teacher preparation) at Denison University.
Granville has a Village Council elected by the voters. The Council employs a full time Manager who is responsible for administering the day-to-day affairs
of the Village. The Mayor is selected by the Council members from among its
membership. I preside at Council meetings, conduct a weekly Mayor' s court
mostly traffic violations), and represent the Village in ceremonial affairs.
I shall be anxious to hear from you. If you are favorable to the idea of
a "Sister/ Friendship City" relation'ship, I shall take the matter to the Village Council to enlist its support and suggestions.
Aer*sincerely yours,
Thomas F. Galla* MayoH
Village of Granville
100%Retycled Paper
TO:
FROM:
RE:
The Granville Village Council
George Williamson
Rama, Nicaragua as a sister city
This proposal includes the following:
1. That the village council express appreciation for his willingness to Mayor Pina, of Rama, correspondence with to pursue the matter of a sister city relationship, in Mayor Gallant.
2. That the village council officially invite the city of Rama to join us in a sister city relationship, and so inform Mayor Pina.
3. Upon completion of arrangements, that the council anticipate supporting activities of educational, cultural, humanitarian in nature, for which it will not necessarily be responsible.
The council has once before considered the advantages of a sister city relationship, with a town of similar size, in a country with which people have miminal contact and understanding. As you know, our invitation for this relationship with the Russian city received no response.
The advantages for this kind of relationship seem to include the following:
ship1s.. A contribution toward world peace, through people to people relation-
civic2.orgAanfirzuaittiofunls, focus for educational activities in the schools, churches, etc.
towa3rd. An opportunity for Granville people to make contribution, together, meeting town needs for people far away.
There are several reasons for proposing a Nicaraguan city.
the p1a. st sAenveuranlusual number of Granville citizens have visited Nicaragua in years.
taken2. A much larger group of Granville citizens and Denison students have special interest in the current situation in Nicaragua.
3. There have been an unusual number of Nicaraguan students at Denison in the past several years, perhaps more than any other single foreign country.
Para4jo.n There is a longstanding relationship between Granville and the Gustavo family. Dr. and Mrs. Parajon met at Denison when they were students here. Their He was at that time a student pastor of the First Baptist Church. The Palraatjeon'son-in-law attended Denison, and their son David has just graduated. Church, and sothmeirssioGnranhvasillebeefrniensdupsp,orftoedr financially by the First Baptist an honorary doctorate by Denison. He is years. Dr. Parajon was awarded of the First Baptist Church in Managua,an American Baptist Missonary, pastor with a large medial practice in a Baptist hospital there. He has a daily radio program on Radio Manaq„ is founder and president of both CEPAD and Provadenic. CEPAD is a and Nanicdaradgevuealo, pmweitnht agency, sponsored by over 40 Protestant demoanhinuagteionrselieinf clinics and offices in over 400 Nicaraguan communities.
Provadenic is a medical and dental agency, also with clinics all over the
country. Dr. Parajon is perhaps the most prominant Protestant leader on
the scene in Nicaragua today, with much influence in public affairs.
5. Given the enormous tensions between our country and Nicaragua, the
people to people relationship is potentially of great value. There are a
number of such relationships already in existence. Seattle has a sister
city relationship with Managua, through which cultural and other exchanges
of reportedly enormous benefit to both cities have been accomplished. Wisconsin
has a sister state relationship with a country of Nicaragua. It was on a
visit to Wisconsin and this official relationship, that the Vice-President
of Nicaragua announced the release of Mr. Hasenfuss, the America agent who
had been captured there. The official statement expressed gratitude to the
intervention of the Governor of Wisconsin, gratitude to the people of Wisconsin
for their continuing relationship, and acknowledge that Mr. Hasenfuss was
from Wisconsin.
Rama is proposed in particular for the following reasons:
1. Rama is an extremely poor town, and could greatly benefit from this
relationship.
2. A few of our people, Doug Donley, Marilyn Marshall, and I, visited
Rama in the Spring of 1986. We have pictures, stories, and names of individuals
that can be shared. I spent some time with the Mayor, a former divinity
student, a man of passion and considerable theological depth, and continue
in correspondence with him.
3. Rama is a most interesting place. It is the eastern most town in
Nicaragua that can be accessed by road. By means of the Rama River, Rama
is the means of access to Bluefields, the only port on the Atlantic coast.
4. Rama is far from urban Nicaragua, far from the scenes either of significant
oppressive activity in the Somdsa Days, or from the Revolutionary
conflicts. People in Rama are rather distant to the Revolution. They are
extremely individualistic, much as the frontier people of our old west.
They are suspiciou both of the revolution and of the counter-revolution,
in other words, Rama is not a place where ideology has taken much root.
5. The poverty, ignorance, and need in Rama is deeply moving. There
is no fresth water supply. Sewage flows openly in the streets. Housing
is ramshacklely and very poor. Rama is the center of a policial unit of
about 40,000 people, but the village itself has a population of about 14,000.
6. There is a CEPAD office in Rama. Because of the close relationship
between CEPAD and many Granville citizens, we have a special channel to facilate
communication.
Please consider these proposals. I will be at the council meeting on
August 19th to discuss them with you. These proposals represent the concerted
efforts and ideas of more than two dozen Granville people.
Yours,
o--YV-I<,
George Williamson
223 E. Elm Street
Provadenic is a medical and dental agency, also with clinics all over the
country. Dr. Parajon is perhaps the most prominant Protestant leader on
the scene in Nicaragua today, with much influence in public affairs.
5. Given the enormous tensions between our country and Nicaragua, the
people to people relationship is potentially of great value. There are a
number of such relationships already in existence. Seattle has a sister
city relationship with Managua, through which cultural and other -exchanges
of reportedly enormous benefit to both cities have been accomplished. Wisconsin
has a sister state relationship with a country of Nicaragua. It was on a
visit to Wisconsin and this official relationship, that the Vice-President
of Nicaragua announced the release of Mr. Hasenfuss, the America agent who
had been captured there. The official statement expressed gratitude to the
intervention of the Governor of Wisconsin, gratitude to the people of Wisconsin
for their continuing relationship, and acknowledge that Mr. Hasenfuss ·was
from Wisconsin.
Rama is proposed in particular for the following reasons:
1. Rama is an extremely poor town, and could greatly benefit from this
relationship.
2. A few of our people, Doug Donley, Marilyn Marshall, and I, visited
Rama in the Spring of 1986. We have pictures, stories, and names of individuals
that can be shared. I spent some time with the Mayor, a former divinity
student, a man of passion and considerable theological depth, and continue
in correspondence with him.
3. Rama is a most interesting place. It is the eastern most town in
Nicaragua that can be accessed by road. By means of the Rama River, Rama
is the means of access to Bluefields, the only port on the Atlantic coast.
4. Rama is far from urban Nicaragua, far from the scenes either of significant
oppressive activity in the Somdsa Days, or from the Revolutionary
conflicts. People in Rama are rather distant to the Revolution. They are
extremely individualistic, much as the frontier people of our old west.
They are suspiciou both of the revolution and of the counter-revolution,
in other words, Rama is not a place where ideology has taken much root.
5. The poverty, ignorance, a,id need in Raina is deeply moving. There
is no fresth water supply. Sewage flows openly in the streets. Housing
is ramshacklely and very poor. Rama is the center of a policial unit of
about 40,000 people, but the village itself has a population of about 14,000.
6. There is a. CEPAD office in Rama. Because of the close relationship
between CEPAD and many Granville citizens, we have a special channel to facilate
communication.
Please consider these proposals. I will be at the council meeting on
August 19th to discuss them with you. These proposals represent the concerted
efforts and ideas of more than two dozen Granville people.
Yours,
0-V- 0 ;
George Williamson
223 E. Elm Street 1
CONCERNED CITIZENS
INVOLVED IN SISTER CITY OF RAMA
Julie Mulrop
David Woodyard
Barbara Klatt
Tom and Patti Burkett
Carol and George Williamson Peter Williamson
Bill and Nancy Nichols
Pat and Kirby Thomas
Dan Williamson
David Parajon
Barbara Bruner
Steve Schmidt
Jack Kirby
Chris Williamson
Barbara Marshall
Paul King
Marilyn Marshall
Doug Donley
Don and Mary Schilling
Ron and Margo Santoni Rev. Ed Burdick
Jean Barnes
The DenisonN-icaragua Connection
Lloyd Wyse graduated from D.U in '26 (Alumni Office has him as class of
27)as a 85 with Departmental Honors in BotanyH(!e)was a Baptist
missionary in Nicaragua for 32 years,serving as principal of the Baptist
School in Managua from 1929 to 1958. Three of his five children Call of
whom grew up in Nicaragua)attended Denison:David 5('6) re(tired Air
Force Colonel),Philip 5('9) B(A Highest Honors in Music, taught piano)
and Marion Wyse Metz(x'62) .When Lloyd retired in 1958 he returned to
Granville and was on the Denison Library staff until his death in 1967.
While Director of the Colegio Bautista,Lloyd Wyse encouraged 3
Nicaraguan students to come to Denison in the same year as his son Phil:
Eduardo Sanchez s( p?w)h,o stayed only for one year (but played great
soccer,l'm told),Gustavo Parajon '59, and Alejandro Martinez '59.
Alex Martinez went to OSU grad school and returned to Nicaragua as a
physics engineer;he now farms and worked for the government in
transport. His 3 eldest children have attended Denison: Julieta '84,a
Biology Major, is in Nicaragua as a Long Term Team member with Witness
for Peace, Alex '86, a Physics major, is in grad school in St. Louis,and
Lisa '88, PsychologyF/rench, is on Study Abroad in France.
Gus Parajon (High Honors in Chemistry,Phi Beta Kappa)married Joan
Morgan '58 (Music).He went to medical school at Case Wesern Reserve
and later got a Master's in Public Health at Harvard. He returned to
Nicaragua as the first director of PROVADENIC,a primary health care
program that has had a major impact in rural areas. After the Managua
earthquake in 1972 he helped found CEPAD,a relief and development
organization that continues an important role today. He also has been
involved in I iteracy programs,and was ordained a Baptist minister in
1978. He received an honorary degree from Denison during the
sesquicentennial celebrations (1981)and the Dahlberg Prize for Peace in
the same year. From the beginning,his work in Nicaragua has been
supported by Ohio and Granville Baptists,and he often returns to the U.S.
on speaking trips. Joan has worked with him and,among other things,
directs the choir at the Baptist church in Managua. The Parajons' son David Parajon '87 is currently at Denison. Edwin Gutierrez x83, another import from the Colegio Bautista to Denison,only stayed here
for a year,and later married the Parajons daughter Marta. He died in 1984.
Milton Arguello 84,a Colegio Bautista graduate and D.U. Biology
major,returned to Managua after graduation and works with Gus at CEPAD.
Classmate Wendy Abramson is also in Managua,doing translating work.
Arvilla L. Brewer 6' 2 is at the American Nicaraguan School U(.S.
Embassy)in Managua. Kay Stubbs x'73 is on the North American Desk of
the Ministry of the Exterior N( icaraguan State Dept.i)n Managua.S (he
appeared briefly on "60 Minutes "a few weeks ago,translating for Daniel
Ortega during his interview with Mike Wallace.1)d (iscovered her Denison
connection by accident while visiting the Ministry to drop off a report. 1
was introduced as the biology professor of several people she knew
through the Baptist Church in Managua [ Edwin,Julieta and Milton]and she
said O" h,at what college?Denison?Of course I know it-1 w-ent there for
a year!"R)o.bert Armstrong 6' 3 is much concerned with the U.S. role in
Nicaragua as Executive Director of the North American Congress on Latin
America.
A number of Denisonians have visited Nicaragua or worked in Nicaragua
through the auspices of Witness for Peace: Britt Creelman '85 was a
Long Term volunteer;Kathy McNeely '82 and Julieta Martinez are
currently serving on the Long Term Team. Kathy Lewis '86 and Doug
Donley '83, among others,have participated in Witness for Peace
delegations. Doug returned to Nicaragua last summer to help lead a group
of North American Baptists interested in seeing conditions in the country.
Steve Schmidt and George Williamson have recently visited Nicaragua;
Len Jordan and Barry Keenan teach courses about Nicaragua. A number
of Denisonians join others from Granville every Thursday morning
7:30-8:30)at the Peace Park in a vigil protesting Contra aid and the
nature of US involvement in Central America.
I have listed above those Denisonians l can think of who have Nicaraguan
connections;the Archives and Alumni Office have been helpful in checking
and correcting facts. Kim Hardy in Alumni Parent Programs was able to add
the name of Arvilla Brewer (of whom I've learned nothing more than her
address), and Dean Nichols reminded me of Robert Armstrong. I would
appreciate other names or facts, and any correctionsan--updated version
of this will be deposited in the Archives.
Juliana Mulroy
Common Hour: A Naturalist in Nicaragua
20 November 1986
VILLAGE OF GRANVILLE
Mayor's Court Monthly Report
JULY
ES PROCESSED IN MAYOR'S COURT .';'
raffic Citations:
ES TRANSFERRED FROM MAYOR'S COURT
1 Licking County Municipal Court:
Juvenile Court:
FFIC CITATIONS PROCESSED:
cessive Speed:
n Willful/Wanton Disregard for Safety:
1 without Reasonable Control:
1987
MONTH
JUNE 1987
MONTH
JULY 1986
liON111-
Page l.
NLANS-TATEMENT
hlance of Bond Money from Last Month: S 652. 00 657. no 1222. 00
otal Money Collected for this Month:
2883. 00 4354. 00 3068. 00
ital Paid to State (RRF&GRF):
401. 00 338. 00 598. 00
0. 00
ital Paid in Refunds/Overpayments:
0. 00 18. 00
1914. 00 4016. 00 2410. 00
tal Paid to General Fund:
ilance of Bond Money Remaining''. in Account: 1220. 00 652. 00 1690. 00
iERATED CASES BY THE GRANVILLE· POLICE DEPARTMENT
raffic Citations!
52 20
1
irking Tickets: 63 3I
ciminal Complaints: 1 11
43 I 8
47 27 ir Tickets:
ril Complaints: 1 11
iseDl-ismissed: 0 0
illty Waivers (payments out of court):
22 11
ises Appearing in Court: 22 I 8
sured Clear Distance: 22 11 1 28
1 0 0
sregarding Red Signal: 3 3 5
sregarding Stop Sign: 5 1 4
sregarding All Other Traffic Control Devices: 0 0 0
01ted Right Turn on Red Signal: 0 0 0
Vlcohol/Drugs): 4 1, 1 1
edb•n•tainerL/ iquor Consumption: 1 0 0
1 0 0 0
0 0 0
0 0
2 3
R
JULY
MON'111
1987 JUNE1_9__8_1. .11 11-,1.-1-18_-6
MON Ill tiON 1'11
prge 2.
liAIC CITATIONS PROCESSED (con't)
Flng a Police Officer:
0 0 0'
1 0 0
Sling Tires/feeling/ Cracking Exhaust:
Permitting/or: Riding/Hanging Outside Vehicle: 0 0 0
U-Turn (Opposite Direction/Enter Parking Place): 0 0 0
Failure to Yidld:
0 0 1
2 0 2
Equipment Violation:
Pedestrian Violation:
0 0 0
No Operators/Chauffers License: 1 0 2
Opn Under Suspension/ Revocation: i 0
No Motorcycle Endorsement: 1 0 0
Restriction Violation: 0 0 0
Registration/ Title Violation: 0 0 0
Leaving the Scene of an Accident: 0 0 0
Failure to Stop for School Bus Unloading/Loading: 0 0 n
Improper Passing: 0 1 n
1 0 0
All Others:
1
AL COMPLAINTS PROCESSED f
At al Offenses:
Disorderly Conduct/Public Intoxication:
Disturbing the Peace:
Drug Abuse/Possess.ion: 1
IGambling Offenses:
Littering:
Falsification:
Failure to Report a Crime:
Obstructing Official Business:
1
Failure to Aid a Police Officer:
Obstructing Justice:
Resisting Arrest:
Sale of Alcohol to a Minor:
Misrepresentationt
i Container in a Public Place:
al Imposition:
ic Indecency:
Voyeurism:
Importuning:
Assault: 1
JULY 1987 JUNE 1987
MONTH MON1'11
1 1
JUKY 1986
HONTIF-7
Page 3.
URIMINAL COMPLAINTS PROCESSED (con't)
Aggravated Menhcing/ Menacing:
TE gering Children:
hone Harrassment:
1
Domestic Violence:
Arson:
Criminal Damaging:
Criminal Mischief:
Criminal Trespass:
Petty Theft:
Unauthorized Use of Property/Vehicle: 1
Passing Bad Checks: 9
Receiving Stolen Property:
Carrying a Concedled Weapon:
Improperly Handling Firearm in Motor Vehicle:
Discharging Weapons:
Fireworks Violations:
All Others:
Mak' ng false alarm 2
ARKING TICKETS
Violation #1-Double Parking: 0
Violation 2-Fire Hydrant Parking: 0
Violation #3-Parking Facihg the Wrong Direction 4
Violation #4-Parking in a No Parking Zone: I 3
Violation #5-Parking on Crosswalk: 0
Violation #6-Overtime Parking: 0
Violation #7-Parking 20' of Intersectiont I 0
Violation #8-Blocking Dtiveway': 0
liolation #9-Parking on Lawn (Sidewalk/Curb): 0
liolation #10-Parkdd too Far from Curb: 0
i tion #11- Parked on Sidewalk: 0
ition #12-Parked over Diagonal Lines: 0
tion #13-Parked Opposite Excavation:
1
0
1- 32u-Lordinallce : 0
andicapped Parking:
0
ummons Issued for Failure to Pay: 1 1 0.
KtvlbED PARKING 11(KEl (5/11/8/) JULY 1987 JUNE 1987 JULY 1986
VIO #1-Parking on Sidewalk or Curb Lawn:
VIO #2-Blocking Public or Private Driveway:
VT- #3-Parkdd within 20 ft of an intersection:
V #4-Parked on a Crosswalk:
1_ #5-Parked in a No Parking Zone:
VIO #6-Parked Too Far from Curb (Ift or more):
VIO #7-Parked in Same Spot in Excess of 72 Hours:
VIO #8-Overtime Parking:
VIO #9-Parked Facing in Wrong Direction:
VIO #14-Parked in Roadway Creating aTraffic Hazard:
VIO #15-Parked within 10 ft of a Fire Hydrant:
Summons issued for Failure to Pay:
0 2
0
0 1
0 0
33 11
1 1
1 0
6 I 0
1
VIO #10-Parked Outside of Marked Parking Space: 4
VIO #11-In Handicapped Zone w/0 Proper Tags/Placard: 0
VIO #12-Double Parked: 0
VIO #13-Parked Upon a Bridge or Overpass:
0
0
0 0
0 0
0 0
l 2
MANAGER' S REPORT
WATER DEPARTMENT
Total Produced (ME)
Daily Average (MGD)
New Meter Install.
Cust. Svce. Requests
Meters Repaired
Meters Replaced
Final Readings
WASTEWATER TREATMENT
Total Treated (MG)
Daily Average (MGD)
Sludge Removed (MG)
ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST
Julv 1. 987
25· 629
0. 827
8. 6692
0. 2797
0. 1182
Three sewer taps were installed.
Two water taps were installed.
Painting Fire Hydrants.
Note:
MG)
MGD)
Million Gallons
Million Gallons Per Day
5
30
2
49
1
Tiinp 1987
23· 810
0. 794
n
31
0
12
11. 6939
0. 3898
0. 0425
July 1986
32. 060
1. n34
2
11
3
3
15
10. 532
0. 340
37
Manager' s Report
Page III
SERVICE DEPARTMENT
JULY 1987 JUNE 1987 JULY 1986
Amount an ours Amount Man louis Amount flanlifiurs
New Signs 6 8
Signs Replaced 1 2
Street
Maintenance
Hot-Mix-Tons) 2.75 Ton 24
Streets Swept
Hours) 32
Inlets Top
Cleaned)
Inlets Cleaned
Inside) 1
Storm Lines
Cleaned (Jet
Truck)
Inlets Repaired,
Adjusted or
Rebuilt 6 41
Grass Mowed
Acres)
Brush Picked Up
and Chipped
Loads) 10 Loads 48
Leaf Pickup
Loads)
Snow Removal
Salt Water
Gallons)
Trash Pickup 6
Shop & Offices
Cleaned
Backhoe Worked
Days) 2 15
Berm Work (Tons-
Gravel)
Street, Curb and
Guard Rail
1 ,37 painting
Other Projects -
See attachment
Call Out
ZONING
Building Permits
Remodeling Permits
Sidewalk Permits
Demolition Permits
Sign Permits
SPECIAL INTEREST ITEMS
3 Tons
Acres
13 Loads
23
32
9 Tons
7
Acres
8 15loads
VEHICLE MAINTENANCE-144 Hrs.
WELFARE 5 PEOPLE147--H-rs-. -------
84
18
45
56
27
4 8 4 6
61 16 16 26
7
3 3
8 60
32
1
3
0
0
0
OTHER PROJECTS FOR JULY 1987
1)Trimmed branches from signs &around guardrails
2) Cleaned parade route &took signs down for 4 of July
3) Cut down dead tree at Ceader Ln.
4) Placed stones around culvert at New Burg
5) Repaired storm sewer at 110 N. Mulberry
6) Cheaked for leaks &repaired storm sewer at W. Broadway
7)Trimmed limbs at Middle school &Islands
8)Painted Petunia Park &Police station
9) Installed concrete blocks at golf 10)Started course trimming on Palmer Ln.
11) Repaired sewer line at 555 W. Broadway
12)Moved trash can to W. Broadway &Cherry St.
13)Painted 3 flag poles
14) Repaired culvert at Burg &Miller
15) Cleaned weeds out of ditch on Spilman
TOTAL
8.Hrs.
8 Hrs.
4 Hrs.
8 Hrs.
15 Hrs.
59.5 Hrs.
14 Hrs.
6 Hrs.
18 Hrs.
17 Hrs.
73 Hrs.
2 Hrs.
6 Hrs.
5 Hrs.
3 Hrs.
246.5
t..
July 1987
P/lL ACTIVITIES
I'lutg licke.16
Tba &dic CUationd
Trabdic Stop)
Traddle 14/teetion
Ve/Ucte Chec/U
flou,8 e Checka
Su6piciou8 re* 80118
Enterq, 8 FLAe A884816
OCILek Vept. A&844
1,1,pou,tda 8 low.Ot,q
1002 Vatiou
11,wecuked BuitdO,qa
810.to/tat Ahs.t8£8
l'al,w/L lime (110u.U I
COMPLAINT ACTIVITIES
1,1ju/ tg Accide,tu
Non-Injut/y Acciden8£
l,ive,8£4,atto,18 1
Comptainta
OddenAC8
A.LS : (11)
iily , 8fe1l8£odneymemtor
Chequ Lited:(11)
fe·Collu
81£ 6 demea,tor
VEIfICLE MILEAGE,
FUEL UTILIZED,
76
133
80
1087
I 4
20
19
2
216
37
68
773
GRANVILLE POLICE VEPARIMENT
00*Mon,thly Managb*,'a Repottii 0
Monh,(i June 1987
14(1611£e Citation,8
1/laddic S.O(p*
1 Ad 6 6ke Vikeetion
Velacee C/tecks
flolue Chectu
Suviclou,8 re,Uo,1.8
Emeh-si. 6 Fl,Ae A881, 848
0,t(et/t Vel*A.8 -48£18
Impound8 0 10111019
Foot pattot. 6
U,wecuked Buttding8
Moickist 8 8*18 18
Patrot linte 1 1 fou,u 1
COMPLAINT ACTIVITIES
987 Ford LTD
1 Vellicke 1
J985 Chevy Celerity
1 Ve/ticce;
1983 Chevy Impala
522. 7 GaUG,18 ,
409
Illdentekell/
66, 272
1Udomete1 1/
74, 462
odometer'
33
873
19
8
7
1
208 ,
2I
44
349
Molt.Ut: July 1986
Patkt,tg lie/ze.Ii.8
TALiddle Citatic,18
14£1 &d tc Stopd
1'{ addlc t)Dtectioll
Velticte check8
Ilotue Clieck,8
Su81i:c, toll.8 Pe8*04"
Emebg. 0 f,A( e 8*8.i818
0/hek Vevt, A861,818
I#p,outti8{ 0 lou0!14
1-00£pathot-6
Uudecured Build[Lit{18
Motomt A881,818
Pattot limelliou,u I
334
Illite»81
4
227
26
40
86
62
1296
i 3
334
4171
905
781Uu,
2932 total
mile.s)
L[Yue 6 06 Pouep.
PATROL ACTIVITIES
parking 1.lckel,8
COMPLAINT ACIZVITIES
jit luxy Aceidel8l.(
Non-lit fukt,Aceidelti8
Invatiqatio,1,8 1
Comptal,10
04 e,Med
Aue.818 1 (2)
i etoity
818£denlealtok
AININISTRATIVE ACTIVITIES
Adh, ut.S /pectal VetaUB 472
SCAVicies t
PAIROL ACI I VIl IES
28
63 3I
52 20 53
29
52
11
3
60
1
1
1 lit luky Accident8 0 0
9 NonI-njuhq Accd£en8,( 6 7
Inve81£4dito,181
203 Comptainta 167 168
li 0*dende.8 I 3 9
AUU8.(1 (9)
0 recolly 0 n
9 818£demeatol/ 3 2
Chau/tes Lited: 9( ) ***CIK*DAge*d F*.U*ed*2,()
0 Ttto4" 0 Feco,11/ 0
6 MOdemea, tok 8 Mudentemtor . 0
AVMINIS:IRATIVE ACTIVITIES At* IINISTRAIIVE ACIIVITIES
Adt, :01 .S /peciat Vetal5, 5 1 1 Ad,itin S.p/eciat Velalf.8 475
SCAVice8 1 SekviCU I 1
MaiL 22 Mate I 7 81(liC I 7
Ilcuid. VeUveked Mate 33 land Vetiveked Matt 86 lf,uid Ve,Uve/ted Mate 56
fwteut 138coh8,( 1 0 f ultehat 6 [cobij 0 tu,le/tat E&04(8 11
Ballk Eacoh8,( 2I Bank E8 coL/ i8 11 Bcuth EAcon8,( 12
UJ,
uW-- iSl.
Firu-!
I5FTH--
STA-7
DEPARTMENT REPOFF98'!' R 13
wivISION PAGE 1 OPER 0
j 2 CITY GRANVILLE UH i t. 0/0/1/W/
t 3 MONTH OF JULY
1.1
MUNIMLY YUNU KTMUK 1
16' ACCOUNT
BALANCE
BALANCE
1 u iuK=ED ATM-ORTF' rENEDlqC-U-M-B-EREUNITE!-- I
1
6---=-
110
7FJ A 1 GENERAL
8.21 132,871.53 101,5SZ.12 44,461.97 189,992.68 6,680.86 183,311.82
113,-L 1 QI KEET
11,9,4-U ./ 0,0/1.b¤ 6,1 Yl.tiz
I.
1,4/8.8 / 040.96 51
6,
B 2 HIGHWAY=
49.11 297.72 - 7.82
B 7 REVENUE SHARING
109.01 00 109.01
181 5,523.60 00 449.08 5,074.52 750.00 4,324.52 6 8 8 rEMM-LE1,vE Z MA 1=0 UU UU U0 UU
C_1 -DEBr SERVICE 1
00 00
25,022.14 17,579.40 10,388.50 32,513.04 76 C 2 SEWER CONSTRUCTION FUND
32,513.04
267,054.62 1,261.04 3,363.37 264,952.29
7« W, tK=*
264,952.29
Ktri- HLEMEN 1 -r-IMP' REIvt[izin ZE,004.44 2,4.1 b.OU il,USU.01 El WATERc .'-
41,053.01
75,912.77 41,018.98 28,346.55
E 2 SEWER
88,585.20 15,490.10 73,095.09
12,560.09 25,156.08 18,403.86 19,312.31 4,069.41 15,242.90 E o ©EWTA Utu i nt.AVALt t-UNU
1.01
17,4/4.0.. LU,tlM4.ZE 36,Obe.al 36,358.61 E 7 SEWER DEBT SERVICE RESERVE FUND
411
153,968.47 45.45 154,013.92 154,013.92 E91 WATER CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT 24,045.41
24,045.41 24,045.41
D1 CA L.Ht' l 1 HL 1 MYRLA/ trlt:4 1 6,YE. L.65
5,982.65 561.00 6,421.65 m F Z EQUIPMENT RESERVE 140 127,343.64 400.00 126,943.64 14,510.00 112,433.64 12 6 5 HILENGREEN ESCROW -ln-- SPECI
6,633.21 153,
6,633.21 6,633.21
HL HipbtbbtiV)'/1 b LU,W'.LL JELLS.
1 -
20,822.32 20,822.32
598 -
GRAND TOTALS ****913,941.04 * 214,216.49 * 112,242.97 *1,015,914.55 * 43,540.15 * 972,374.40 * 0.50 -'.7 .
0
00
00
UU 00
UU 00
00 00
00 00 00
00 00
00
00 00 00
00 00 00
I-
1
rL -
414144111,21i1,,.48-71
91l1891Ai- - dA™
41, 182
FUND
GENERAL
STREET
HIGHWAY
REVENUE SHARING
PE ISSIVE TAX
E SERVICE
SEWER CONST. FUND
SEWER REPL &IMPVT
WATER
SEWER
SWR DEBT SVC FUND
SWR DEBT SVC RSVE FD
WATER CAP IMPVT
SEWER CAP IMPVT
EQUIPMENT RSVE
HILENGREEN ESCROW
Sr -CIAL ASSESSMENTS
BALANCE
1/1/87
69,173
11, 179
325
17,814
0
30,552
3,714
14,375
42,339
13,340
16, 126
152,796
25,645
8,537
127,344
6,693
16,221
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
VILLAGE OF GRANVILLE
YTD 1987
RECEIPTS
484,712
19,336
1,568
729
0
92,009
431,017
16,678
234,208
122,933
81, 470
9,072
0
0
0
60)
9,444
DISBURSEMENTS
363,892
21,992
1, 784
13,468
0
90,048
169,779
0
187,962
116,961
61,238
7,855
1,600
1, 277
400
0
4,843
BALANCE
7/31/87
189,993
8,523
109
5,075
0
32,513
264,952
31, 053
88,585
19, 312
36,359
154,014
24,045
7,260
126,944
6,633
20,822
T AL ALL FUNDS 556,174 1,503,117 1,043,099 1,016,192

Employee Payroll / Compensation

The Village has thirty-six (36) full-time employees, 16 regular part-time employees and seaonal employees. Village Personnel Policy

Go to My Pay Stub and login.